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TS-590S


HF/50 MHz ALL MODE TRANSCEIVER


ABOUT THIS MANUAL


This in-depth manual is intended to explain the features of the TS-590S and its
convenient use. We hope that this manual, as a general HF transceiver guide
will be of your benefit, to whoever reads this manual, whether you have already
purchased a TS-590S, are thinking of purchasing of this product, or are
interested in HF transceivers.

About Copyright

Copyright of this Manual and Software

All copyrights and other intellectual property rights for this in-depth manual
and relevant technical documents as well as the software described in this
in-depth manual and relevant technical documents, and help texts and manuals
attached to the software are owned by Kenwood Corporation.

A right to use the software described in this in-depth manual and relevant
technical documents, and help texts and manuals attached to the software is
granted to a licensee by Kenwood Corporation; however, the title to and
ownership for the software shall be owned by Kenwood Corporation. Refer to this
in-depth manual and relevant technical documents, and help texts and manuals
attached to the software for details.

Kenwood Corporation does not warrant that quality and performance of the software described in this
in-depth manual and relevant technical documents, and help texts and manuals attached to the
software conform to the applicability of any use, and Kenwood Corporation shall be free from liability for
any defects, damage or loss, or from any warranty for anything other than what is expressly described
in this in-depth manual and relevant technical documents, and help texts and manuals attached to the
software.

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of all in-depth manual and relevant technical documents, and help texts and
manuals attached to the software written and made by Kenwood Corporation.


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registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
• All other product names referenced herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective
manufacturers. ™ and ® are omitted in this manual.

Other Restrictions


The measured values exampled in this document are examples and do not guarantee
the performance of the model.

Cover 2
TS-590S

CONTENTS
1
RECEPTION ..................................... 1
1.1 Type of Conversion............................1
1.2 Down Conversion...............................3
1.3 Up Conversion....................................8
1.4 RX Auxiliary Circuits...........................9

2 TRANSMISSION............................. 11
2.1 Kenwood Traditional Transmitting Circuitry ..............................11
2.1.1 IF Circuits .........................................11
2.1.2 FET Final Circuit...............................11
2.2 High-speed Relay-controlled Antenna Tuner...............................13
2.3 REMOTE Connector ........................13
2.4 DRV Terminal...................................15

3 LOCAL OSCILLATOR ................... 19

4 DSP................................................. 20
4.1 Multipurpose 32-bit Floating Point DSP...................................20
4.2 Advanced AGC Control via IF Digital Processing...........................21
4.3 Interference Elimination Within AGC Loop ..............................23
4.3.1 Digital IF Filter ..................................23
4.3.2 Types of Digital IF Filters..................24
4.3.3 Manual Notch Filter and Auto Notch Filter .............................25
4.3.4 Digital Noise Blanker (NB2)..............26
4.4 Demodulation...................................27
4.5 Modulation........................................28
4.6 DSP-based Auxiliary Circuits (for RX) ............................29
4.6.1 Beat Cancel (AF Processing) ...........29
4.6.2 Noise Blanker NB2 (IF Processing) .................................30
4.6.3 Overview of Noise Reduction ...........31
4.6.4 NR1 (Spectral Subtraction Method) (AF Processing) .....................32
4.6.5 NR1 (Based on a Line Enhancer) (AF Processing) ........................34
4.6.6 NR2 (AF Processing)........................35
4.7 DSP-based Auxiliary Circuits (for TX) .............................36
4.7.1 Speech Processor (AF Processing)................................36
4.8 DSP-based Auxiliary Circuits (Common to TX/RX) ........................ 37
4.8.1 TX Equalizer & RX Equalizer (AF Processing) ..........................37

5 SOFTWARE: ENHANCING OPERATING PLEASURE...............38
5.1 Extended Data-mode Related Functions .................................. 38
5.2 Drive Out..........................................39
5.3 Single Button Toggles IF Filters between A and B.............................. 40
5.4 Double Function Keys and Hold Time Selection ........................... 41
5.5 Mode Selection of Built-in Electronic Keyer ............................ 41
5.6 Switchover of Shift Frequency Interlocked with Change of Pitch Frequency 41
5.7 Power-on Message .......................... 41
5.8 Quick Memory Function ................... 42
5.9 Cross Tone Function........................ 42
5.10 PF Keys ........................................... 42
5.11 Expansion of Voice Guide Function (Optional VGS-1 Required)..............44
5.12 Easy Updating of Firmware.............. 45

6 APPEARANCE DESIGN: “DESIGN CONCEPT” REVEALED BY DESIGNING ENGINEER........46

7 STRUCTURAL FEATURES............47
7.1 Cooling.............................................47
7.2 LCD..................................................50
7.3 Main Control Knob ........................... 51

8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE....................................52
8.1 Windows Related Software..............52
8.2 System Configurations.....................52
8.2.1 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the COM Connector ................52

TS-590S


CONTENTS

8.2.2 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the USB Connector ................ 53
8.2.3 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the COM and ACC2 connectors
(microphone and speaker connected to the PC to be used)..................... 53
8.2.4 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the USB connector (microphone and
speaker connected to the PC to be used) ........................... 53
8.2.5 Controlling TS-590S from a PC on a Remote Site ...................... 54

8.3 New ARCP-590 (Amateur Radio Control Program for TS-590S) Freeware .......54
8.3.1 Basic Specifications Inherited from ARCP-480 ........................ 55
8.3.2 User Interfaces ................................ 55
8.3.3 KNS (Kenwood Network Command System) ................................. 56
8.3.4 Visual Scan...................................... 58
8.3.5 Audio Equalizer................................ 58
8.4 ARHP-590 (Amateur Radio Host Program) Freeware ..........................59
8.4.1 Basic Specifications Inherited from ARHP-10.............................. 59
8.4.2 User Interfaces ................................ 59
8.4.3 KNS (Kenwood Network Command System) ............................. 60
8.4.4 Disabling AF Gain Control from ARCP-590 ........................ 60
8.5 New ARUA-10 (USB Audio Controller) Freeware ............................60
8.5.1 Basic Functions ............................... 61
8.5.2 Operation ......................................... 61
8.5.3 Setup ............................................... 61
8.5.4 Starting and Stopping ARUA-10...... 62
8.5.5 Adjusting Volume............................. 62
8.5.6 Automatic Execution when Windows Starts ............................. 62
8.6 New ARVP-10H (Amateur Radio VoIP Program) Freeware .....................63
8.6.1 Basic Functions ............................... 64
8.6.2 Setup of ARVP-10H (Host Station)................................... 64
8.6.3 Making ARVP-10H (host station) Online or Offline .................... 64
8.6.4 Setup of ARVP-10R (remote station)................................ 65
8.6.5 Connecting and Disconnecting ARVP-10R (Remote Station) ........... 65
8.6.6 Adjusting Volume............................. 65
8.7 New Virtual COM Port Driver ...........66

9 OPTIONAL ACCESSORY ............. 67
9.1 PS-60 Regulated DC Power Supply .....................................67
9.2 Rectifier Circuit.................................68
9.3 Switching Circuit, Constant-voltage Circuit and Protection Circuit ......68

TS-590S


PRODUCT PLANNING OBJECTIVES

At the end of September, 2010, the TS-590S, a Kenwood HF band amateur radio
transceiver was launched after the 7-year long silence since the releasing of
TS-480S.

As implied by this model name, TS-590S is the “legitimate successor to the
TS-570S”. The product category taken over from the TS-570S by the TS-590S was
created by combining the line of compact HF transceivers that was initiated by
the TS-120S and inherited by TS-450S; and the line of TS-500s represented by
the TS-520S that swept the market. The product is designed as a transceiver in
a preferable price-to-performance range that has sufficient features and
performance for the day-to-day use and that arrives with a compact size that is
convenient for operations from a fixed station as well as from a mobile station
for use in any fields.

One of the noteworthy planning policies is improvement of fundamental receive
performance. To achieve the objective, a new structure has been employed for
the front end. However, the performance of a transceiver as a whole is not
determined solely by the front end. It is imperative to carefully design, in
addition to the DSP and local oscillator, all the other elements including
transmit performance and ease of operation in a comprehensive manner.

On the TS-590S, we have also made a drastic modification to the external
appearance and we are confident it has a “face” that satisfies all HF users.
Following are the major features of the TS-590S:

  • Superb receive performance and astounding adjacent dynamic range characteristics
  • Adoption of powerful roofing filters of 500 Hz/ 2.7 kHz (During the reception

in CW, FSK and SSB modes in 1.8 MHz, 3.5 MHz, 7 MHz, 21 MHz amateur bands, and
if the final passband is 2.7 kHz or less, either of the filters is
automatically selected.)

• Superior C/N (carrier-to-noise ratio) thanking to the high-precision DDS
(direct digital synthesizer) Substantial reduction of noise caused by unwanted
adjacent signals

  • Adoption of a 32-bit floating point DSP to realize various functions
  • Advanced digital AGC control realized with DSP processing of the signal

derived from the IF stage

• A wide variety of interference removal functions including newly developed
noise reductions, WIDTH/SHIFT and IF notch

  • High-reliability design that offers stable operation
  • Heavy-duty specifications for a rig enduring from continuous operation in a

contest and similar occasions

  • Built-in automatic antenna tuner
  • High frequency stability of ±0.5 ppm thanking to the optional SO-3 TCXO (from

-10°C through +50°C or 33.8°F to 122.0°F) (The transceiver frequency is ±5ppm
when the SO-3 option is not installed)

  • Outstanding operational ergonomics, more comfortable transmission and reception
  • Easy-to-use menu structure allowing excellent operability
  • Large-size display equipped with the selectable LED backlight from 2 colors
  • USB port that accepts not only control signals but enables input/output of

transmit/receive audio signals from a PC For details, refer to these pages
providing technical explanations.

TS-590S

CONTENTS


Development Spirit

TS-590S was planned as the “legitimate successor to the TS-570S” after 14 years
or more of time have elapsed since the first market appearance of TS-570S in
1996. TS-590S is titled with the 500s model number with the TS-570S but,
needless to say, we started the development as a totally new transceiver.

First, let’s look back on the TS-570S.

The product concepts of the TS-570S were “ease of operation” and “providing
basic performance sufficient for rag-chewing and DX operation at a preferable
price range”.

Soon after the launch of the TS-570S, the simple exterior appearance with
rounded buttons stirred both positive and negative market comments, but we have
received many favorable opinions from users who actually used the transceiver,
such as “Buttons are easy to press” and “Setup of functions is easy to
understand”.

In fact, the TS-570S employed an up-conversion circuitry configuration that was
very popular at that time and provided sufficient basic performance in a
transceiver having the cost-to-performance-ratio price range. The TS-570S
incorporated an AF DSP, which was usually offered as an external device around
that time, and received favorable reception as “a younger brother” of TS-870S
that was equipped with IF DSP.

The most notable feature of the TS-590S is the superior receive performance
that exceeds expectations in its the cost-to-performance-ratio price range. It
goes without saying, of course, that we invested as much effort in all the
other elements as in the RX circuit in developing the TS-590S.

In evaluating a transceiver, in addition to electrical characteristics
represented by numerical data, ease of operation and visibility are also
important criteria. As for ease of operation, Kenwood has been developing
transceivers on the basis of operability of successive HF transceivers, to
which users' voices also have been reflected; therefore, we need to take the
history and background into consideration while designing a product.

Though the new TS-590S inherits the DNA of Kenwood’s HF transceivers, new
technologies and ideas are also added. We are confident that all users, from
the newest user to the most experienced veteran user, will be satisfied with
this transceiver.

As for the development objectives and backdrop of the “totally new” portion of
the product, we will reveal them in the technical explanations of the chapters
subsequently.

Be our guest and allow us to share the development background of the TS-590S
and what’s in the spirit of the development engineers.

Kenwood HF Transceiver Development Team

CONTENTS

TS-590S


1 RECEPTION

Type of Conversion

Receive performance is one of the key indicators that is used to evaluate a
transceiver. And, above all, the capability to protect against interference
from adjacent signals close to the target signal is of the utmost importance.

To attain this goal, a circuit with a good large signal behavior characteristic
is used for the first mixer of the RX section. In recent years, a filter used
between the mixer and the subsequent stage (roofing filter) is also gaining
much attention as a very important component.

About 30 years ago, an up-conversion circuit configuration (where the first IF
is higher than the upper limit of RX frequency) appeared as an RX circuit
design to provide general coverage receiving from LF through the HF band. This
RX system was also adopted by amateur radio transceivers of the time to enable
reception of overseas broadcasting and other signals outside amateur bands and,
as a result, from that time on, almost all HF transceivers have been equipped
with an up-conversion RX section.

The passband of roofing filters used in an up-conversion RX design is typically
15 to 20 kHz. However, in the case an interfering signal is only several kHz
away from the target signal, the interfering signal also passes the roofing
filter and the target signal is masked first in the subsequent stage. As a
result, sometimes the performance of the first mixer was not extended to the
best use.

That is the reason a design to switch the pass bandwidth to be 3 kHz, 6 kHz, or
15 kHz is becoming prevalent in recent transceivers. Some products can select a
bandwidth as narrow as several hundred Hz and these products are very highly
accepted in the market.

Meanwhile, Kenwood’s HF transceivers, which were designed 7 years ago or
earlier, adopt roofing filters with a wide passband. Obviously, they still have
satisfactory performance outside the pass bandwidth.

Against this backdrop, we started the development of the TS-590S by considering
the circuit type that mostly focuses on the characteristics of adjacent
interference elimination.

In the early stage of the TS-590S’s product development, considering the
product positioning in the market, we also examined the RX design to be able to
switch among the roofing filters of 3 kHz, 6 kHz and 15 kHz. However, the
bandwidth of 3 kHz is too wide for CW, though it is fairly narrow for an SSB.
We wanted to adopt a 500 Hz filter by all means for CW enthusiasts. However,
there was a big challenge to be solved.

When it comes to the pass bandwidth of a roofing filter, at a frequency as high
as 73 MHz, which is Kenwood’s mainstream first IF frequency, it is difficult to
mass-produce filters with bandwidth as narrow as 500 Hz. To solve this problem,
there was no other choice but to lower the first IF frequency.

After reviewing, we decided to lower the first IF to 11.374 MHz. This is called
a down-conversion design. (If the receive frequency is lower than 11.374 MHz,
the operation will be up conversion. However, because the first IF is lower
than the highest receive frequency (60 MHz), we call the conversion type “down
conversion”.)

Yet, this circuit design has a drawback. When the IF frequency that was once
raised 30 years ago to provide general coverage reception is lowered again (to
8.83 MHz that was then used), images and spurious signals are produced (which
are relevant not only to reception but to transmission) and these causes must
be addressed one by one.

Needless to say, it is technically possible to tackle individual problems but,
to do so, many additional circuits and components are required, which may
result in a higher product price. In terms of market positioning, TS-590S must
be a product in a competitive price range having higher cost-toperformance
ratio. After examining various frequency configurations, we have selected a
dual-mode conversion frequency configuration for the new TS-590S to satisfy
both the performance and price requirements.

TS-590S

CONTENTS


1 RECEPTION

2nd Mixer73.095 MHz 10.695 MHz1st Mixer
11.374 MHz1st
IF
DSP
Down-conversion path
Double superheterodyne
For 1.8/ 3.5/ 7/ 14/ 21 MHz Amateur bands
If RX passband is 2.7 kHz or less
When receiving in SSB/ CW/ FSK modes
Up-conversion path

Triple superheterodyne

For all the conditions (incl. when transmitting) other than listed above for
down conversion 3rd Mixer 24 kHz
(Blocks that are not relevant for the explanation of the conversion type are
omitted.)

Figure 1-1 Dual-mode Conversion Frequency Configuration

First, let us begin with explanation about the up-conversion path.

In the up-conversion path, double-headed arrows are shown at each stage
pointing in both directions. This means a transmit signal as well as a receive
signal is processed in the up- conversion path. The circuit configuration is a
triple-conversion design featuring an IF DSP, a typical configuration for an HF
transceiver. (Replacing the IF DSP with an AF DSP and the third Mixer with a
modulator and demodulator changes it to be the configuration of TS-480S.)

The pass bandwidth of the filter is about 15 kHz at 73.095 MHz, and at 10.695
MHz, it varies depending on the mode and the RX bandwidth. In CW, SSB and FSK
modes, the bandwidth is 2.7 kHz, in AM mode 6 kHz, and in FM mode 15 kHz. (In
transmit, the signal passes the 6 kHz filter regardless of the mode. The final
bandwidth is determined by the DSP.)

The up-conversion path is applied only in conditions when no down-conversion
path is used.

Next is the down-conversion path.

In the down-conversion path, only a single-ended arrow is shown at each stage.
This means the down-conversion operation is applied only to RX signals.

Also, in the figure the conditions in which the down conversion operates are
described. These conditions are designed to cover the bands, modes and
bandwidths that are commonly used in a contest and on similar occasions.

On the surface, the circuit configuration may seem too complex and wasteful.
Still, due to the frequency configuration that focuses on particular points,
the general coverage reception across the continuous frequency range of 30 kHz
through 60 MHz covered by the VFO is maintained as on previous models. As a
result, we have successfully produced a transceiver in a competitive price
range that achieves excellent receive performance comparable to the most
high-end HF transceivers on the market.

As for the up-conversion path, though the same frequency configuration is used
as in the previous models, the roofing filters have been improved to have
better characteristics to protect against interference within the pass
bandwidth. For details, refer to 1.3 Up Conversion.

CONTENTS

TS-590S


1 RECEPTION

1.2 Down Conversion

Figure 1-2 Block diagram: Down Conversion

Figure 1-2 describes the circuit configuration around the first mixer of the
down-conversion path, showing the relationships between frequencies upon
receipt of a 14 MHz signal.

The signal from the antenna passes the RF BPF or LPF (as a receive LPF, it
divides the frequency band of 30 kHz to 60 MHz into 12 ranges) and RF Amp (or
bypasses it) to be sent into the first mixer. Because in the first mixer
section, a different mixer is used for the up conversion and down conversion
respectively, the suitable mixer is selected according to the conditions.


Figure 1-3 Receiver Mixer Circuit

TS-590S

CONTENTS


1 RECEPTION

The receiver mixer circuit is a quad mixer consisting of four 2SK1740 JFETs.

The mixer circuit achieves superior characteristics thanks to the revision of
I/O port matching and the optimization of biases.

With the signal provided by the first local oscillator, the RX signal is
converted to 11.374 MHz (first IF frequency).

The converted RX signal passes the first roofing filter of pass bandwidth 6 kHz
and in the subsequent stage the signal is moderately amplified by the post
amplifier, and sent into the second roofing filter. Part of the signal is also
sent to the noise blanker.

The role of the first roofing filter is to limit the bandwidth for the sake of
the noise blanker. We have selected a pass bandwidth of 6 kHz that does not
affect pulse noise. Besides, by setting the intercept point of the post
amplifier higher than that of the mixer, the deterioration of the two-tone
characteristics is minimized within the pass bandwidth.

For second roofing filters, two 6-pole MCFs of 500 Hz and of 2.7 kHz
respectively are equipped as standard at the time of purchase of your
transceiver. Which filter is used is automatically determined according to the
final pass bandwidth, i.e. depending on the conditions including the bandwidth
selection made with WIDTH or LO CUT/ HI CUT controls on the front panel.

For example, in CW or FSK mode, if WIDTH is 500 Hz or less, the 500 Hz filter
is selected and if WIDTH is 600 Hz or more, 2.7 kHz filter is selected. In SSB
mode, if the difference between the HI CUT and LO CUT frequencies is 2.7 kHz or
less, the 2.7 kHz filter is selected and if the combination produces exceeds a
difference of 2.7 kHz, the up-conversion path is automatically applied. (In
SSBDATA mode, if WIDTH is 500 Hz or less, the 500 Hz filter is selected.)

In AM and FM modes, because the pass bandwidth of the down conversion path is
too narrow, the signal is received with the up conversion path.

These operations are used in the amateur radio bands of 1.8 MHz, 3.5 MHz, 7
MHz, 14 MHz and 21 MHz, and for other amateur radio bands including WRC bands,
and for other frequency ranges of general coverage receiving, up conversion is
used regardless of the mode and pass bandwidth. (Since this switchover is
determined by the CPU taking various conditions into its criteria, the
conversion path cannot manually be selected.)


Figure 1-4 MCF

Figure 1-4 is an image of MCFs. From left to right, there is the 500 Hz filter
at 11.374 MHz that is used in down conversion and next is the 2.7 kHz filter at
11.374 MHz.

At the rightmost filter is the 2.7 kHz filter at 10.695 MHz that is used during
the up-conversion.

CONTENTS

TS-590S


1 RECEPTION

Hints and Tips

“Which type of conversion is used?”

• During the transmission: The up-conversion configuration is always used in
all modes and bandwidths. During the transmission in SSB mode, the pass
bandwidth is determined by the filter settings (digital filter of the DSP)
selected in the menu mode. The pass bandwidth of the filter in the analog stage
is 6 kHz and does not affect the final outcome of the frequency analysis.

• During the reception in AM or FM mode: The up-conversion configuration is
always used regardless of the frequency or pass bandwidth settings.

• If WIDTH is switched from 500 Hz to 600 Hz during the reception in the 3.5
MHz band in CW mode: While the down conversion configuration is maintained, the
roofing filter is switched from 500 Hz to 2.7 kHz.

• LO CUT is changed to 200 Hz when receiving in the 14 MHz band in SSB mode
with LO CUT 300 Hz and HI CUT 3000 Hz: Because the final pass bandwidth exceeds
2.7 kHz, the operation is switched from down- conversion to up-conversion
configuration.

• During the reception in the 50 MHz band in SSB mode with LO CUT 300 Hz and HI
CUT 2700 Hz: The up-conversion configuration is used. Though the pass bandwidth
of the roofing filter is 15 kHz, the 2.7 kHz filter is selected at the second
IF of 10.695 MHz.

Table 1-1 Combination of Filters at Conversion

Conversion Type
Analog IF filter
Frequency Setting
Conditions Setting Example
Frequency Pass
Bandwidth
Down conversion (in 1.8 MHz, 3.5 MHz, 7 MHz,
14 MHz and 21 MHz
bands and if BW is no
more than 2700 Hz)
11.374 MHz
(first IF)
500 Hz BW is no more than 500 Hz 7.005 MHz/ CW WIDTH:
250 Hz
2.7 kHz BW is between 550 Hz and
2700 Hz
14.175 MHz/ USB LO:
100 Hz, HI 2800 Hz
2.7 kHz BW is no more than 2700 Hz 28.250 MHz/ USB LO:
100 Hz, HI: 2800 Hz
Up conversion (in other
than above conditions)
10.695 MHz
(second IF) 6 kHz
SSB BW is between 2750 Hz
and 5000 Hz/AM HI CUT
between 2.5 kHz and 3 kHz
3.560 MHz/ LSB LO:
50 Hz, HI: 3000 Hz
15 kHz AM HI CUT is between 4 kHz
and 5 kHz*1/ FM
50.550 MHz/ AM LO:
100 Hz, HI: 4000 Hz

*1
In AM mode, the bandwidth at the IF stage is equal to the value as double as
the value for HI CUT frequency at the AF stage.

TS-590S

CONTENTS


1 RECEPTION


Following is a graph that provides the comparison between the performances of
roofing filters.


Figure 1-5 Comparison of Bandpass Characteristics of MCFs

Figure 1-5 compares the band pass characteristics of a roofing filter of center
frequency 73 MHz (gray line); and the roofing filters of the center frequency
11.374 MHz with bandwidth of 500 Hz (blue line) and with bandwidth of 2.7 kHz
(orange line) that are both employed by the TS-590S.

Because the center frequency of the filters differ, graphs are overlapped at
the center frequency. The frequency indicated as 0 kHz at the center of the
Frequency [kHz] axis is the receive frequency.

It is apparent that when down conversion is active, large attenuation is
achieved at frequencies other than the target signal.


Figure 1-6 Comparison of Dynamic Range Characteristics

Figure 1-6 shows a graph comparing the dynamic range characteristics of TS-590S
and TS-480S (with CW filter) that are measured by changing the frequency
spacing with the interfering signal.

CONTENTS

TS-590S


1 RECEPTION


Measurement Conditions:

Receive Frequency 14.200 MHz
Mode CW
Pass bandwidth 500 Hz
PRE AMP OFF

The abscissa axis shows the distance from the interfering signal. For example,
it represents that at the point of 10 kHz the receive frequency is 14.200 MHz
and two interfering signals of 14.210 MHz and 14.220 MHz are given.

The orange line shows the result of TS-590S and the gray line shows the result
of TS-480S.

In the event the frequency separation is greater than 20 kHz, the dynamic
ranges of both transceivers exceed 105 dB; however, as the separation becomes
smaller (the interfering signals come closer to the receive frequency), the
dynamic range of TS-480S with conventional MCFs is decreasing. As the graph of
pass bandwidth shows, this results due to the difference of attenuation at the
roofing filter.

Note:
In the receive frequency and its adjacent band, the measurement at the level of
“3 dB higher than the ordinary noise level” may not be feasible due to
influence of the noise generated from its local oscillator. Instead, the level,
which has been reached to S5 with the measurement by an S-meter, is
predetermined as the reference level, and the level is converted to the same
level as the predetermined level, namely “3 dB higher than the ordinary noise
level”, and then appears on the graph of pass bandwidth. For comparison, both
transceivers were measured using the same measuring method. The outcome is an
example and does not warrant the performance of the product.

TS-590S

CONTENTS


1 RECEPTION

1.3 Up Conversion

Difference of characteristics due to the pass bandwidth in the roofing filter
can be viewed in graphs in Figure 1-5 and Figure 1-6. So, let’s see the
characteristics of the up-conversion system in which the same front end
configuration is used as previous models. We will explain using the measurement
result that compares the dynamic range characteristics of TS-590S and of
previous models in the 50 MHz band.


Figure 1-7 Dynamic Range in the 50 MHz Band

Receive Frequency 50.200 MHz
Mode CW
Pass bandwidth 500 Hz
PRE AMP OFF
Comparison
target TS-480S (equipped with YF-107C CW filter)
(The measurement method is the same as that was applied to 14.2 MHz.)

In the 50 MHz band, the signal is received with up conversion on both the
TS-590S and the TS-480S. If the separation between the target signal and the
interfering signal drops below 20 kHz, the dynamic range decreases on both
transceivers. However, on the TS-590S, the outcome is improved for 15 dB even
within the pass bandwidth of the MCF.

This is thanks to the drastic modification of circuitry of the up-conversion
section that was reviewed coupled with the down-conversion path being added.

The same circuit is also used in WRC bands and in general coverage receiving as
well as in the 50 MHz band, and therefore the equivalent performance
improvement is made in those bands.

CONTENTS

TS-590S


1 RECEPTION


1.4 RX Auxiliary Circuits

Typical built-in RX auxiliary circuits include the variable pass bandwidth
circuit, notch filter and noise blanker (NB). In modern HF transceivers, most
of these auxiliary circuits (=auxiliary functions) are made possible by an
arithmetic process of the DSP. As well as the TS-590S, only two auxiliary
circuits operate genuinely at the IF stage: NB and AGC (ATT circuit that
functions by receiving the control signal provided by the DSP).

On the TS-590S, there are two methods available to achieve noise blanking: NB1
and NB2. NB1 is realized by analog processing and NB2 by digital processing of
the IF DSP. Still retaining an analog noise blanker, TS-590S may seem out of
step with the times. But it is critical to have an analog noise blanker for a
receiving system design using narrow roofing filters.

Noise is typically pulse-shaped and when the noise passes a narrow filter, the
pulse waveform is changed to have a wider (longer) pulse width.

Within the DSP, the processing block of the noise blanker is placed in a stage
earlier than the filter block that determines the final pass bandwidth. Thus,
even if the final pass bandwidth is narrowed, the blanking operation can work
properly, free of the influence of the narrowed bandwidth.

However, roofing filters are located far earlier than the DSP, in the later
stage of the first mixer. As a result, in the event the bandwidth of the
roofing filter becomes as narrow as 500 Hz, the pulse width becomes wider and a
conventional digital noise blanker would not deliver a sufficient blanking
effect.

This is the exact case while down conversion is active on the TS-590S and a
digital noise blanker alone may not produce a great enough effect. That is the
reason we have placed a filter of pass bandwidth 6 kHz right after the first
mixer. The filter deters the transformation of the pulse shape and prevents
false operation of the noise blanker due to adjacent signals while sending the
noise signals to the analog noise blanker.

During the up conversion, the noise signal is derived from the second IF stage and delivered to the
noise blanker circuit as in previous models.

Hints and Tips

“What are NB1 and NB2?”

NB1and NB2 are the name of the functions that have been used in TS-930S and all subsequent
products. NB2 was especially designed to have a blanking effect against noise with a long pulse width
and a long period that has been known as the “Woodpecker.” After the woodpecker noise disappeared,
the NB2 function was not employed, but in recent years a new breed of noise called the “China Dragon”
has appeared. So, there may be cases when NB1 alone may not have a great enough effect on the
China Dragon, NB2 has been spotlighted again. Note, however, NB2 on the TS-590S is realized with
digital processing and, thereafter, totally different from NB2 in the TS-930S era.

As explained above, while the narrow bandwidth of the roofing filter is
employed, the noise blanker of the DSP cannot have a sufficient effect.
However, the NB2 realized with the DSP on the TS-590S turns out to be
unexpectedly effective in many occasions, even while the bandwidth is less than
500 Hz in CW mode. This is because the new NB2 can fully adjust the blanking
time to the length of the pulse.

NB2 of the TS-590S is most effective when you want to pick up a weak signal
that is almost buried in the noise with a long pulse width that cannot be
eliminated by NB1. Try NB2 in such occasions and be surprised.

Hints and Tips

“Improvement of sensitivity in the BC band and alteration in ATT attenuation”

On the TS-590S, by changing the circuitry configuration inside the transceiver,
you can change the sensitivity in the BC band and the attenuation amount of the
[ATT] key on the front panel.

TS-590S

CONTENTS


1 RECEPTION


Following is a figure that represents the TX-RX UNIT that has the circuitry
configuration in question. By detaching the lower case, you can access the
jumper connectors CN101 through CN103. CN101 CN102 CN103

Figure 1-8 TX-RX UNIT

1) Raising sensitivity in the BC band:

Remove the jumper for CN103 and insert the jumper into CN102. This will
increase the sensitivity in the BC band for 20 dB. (Assuming that there is the
high output power in local broadcasting stations in the BC band, the
sensitivity is lowered by 20 dB as the is factory default.)

2) Changing the attenuation amount of ATT:

Remove the jumper of CN101. This changes the attenuation of ATT from 12 dB to
20 dB. (Store the removed jumper in a secure place for future use.)

Hints and Tips

“The output level of the headphone jack is too high?”

The headphone jack of the TS-590S is designed to have, as on the previous HF
transceivers, an impedance of 8. (standard). Therefore, if you use a headphone
with impedance higher than 8., you will experience the symptoms as below.

  • The volume level is too high overall.
  • Even if AF Volume is turned down, a hissing residual noise is audible.
  • Even if the beep sound level is set to minimum, the beep sound is loud.

If you experience these symptoms, use a set of headphones with impedance close
to 8..

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
2 TRANSMISSION

Kenwood Traditional Transmitting Circuitry

The tradition of high quality audio technology that users rely on Kenwood to
deliver is produced by combining analog and digital technologies that Kenwood
has nurtured thus far. The DSP controls modulation and determines the sound
quality and analog circuits convey and amplify the signal cleanly.

2.1.1 IF Circuits

The first IF transmit signal that is output at 24 kHz from the DSP and the DA
converter is converted to 10.695 MHz in a dedicated IC for the mixer. The
second IF signal at 10.695 MHz passes an IF filter of 6 kHz bandwidth at which
undesired frequency components outside the pass bandwidth are attenuated before
the signal is amplified. Then, the second IF signal passes to the ALC circuit
that controls the output power to a stable level. After that, the signal goes
through the gain control circuit that corrects the minutely small differences
in gain from band to band, and the signal enters the mixer that is commonly
used in TX and RX, and is converted to the third IF of 73.095 MHz. The signal
passes the gain control circuit that adjusts the signal to the necessary gain
level according to the specified power level. Then, the signal passes the
filter that eliminates spurious components before going into the mixer circuit
that converts the signal to the desired transmit frequency. Also, delicate gain
control is done, such as decreasing the gain of the amplifier while the key is
not depressed in CW mode. By means of these processes, a high-quality transmit
signal with low noise can be acquired. The signal converted to the desired
transmit frequency passes the BPF for removing spurious signals to prevent from
generating interfering signals outside of the transmit bandwidth, and is
amplified to a prescribed level before being sent to the final circuit. The
drive signal produced here can be extracted from the DRV terminal. (While the
output from DRV is selected.)

2.1.2 FET Final Circuit

The final amplifier of the TS-590S is a push-pull amplifier using two pieces of
RD100HHF1 MOSFET from Mitsubishi Electric Semiconductor (Pch 176.5 W). The
drive amplifier also uses an RD100HHF1 MOSFET and the pre-drive amplifier
employs an RD06HHF1 MOSFET and they, despite being 13.8V final circuits,
amplify the signal reasonably in a stable and continuous manner with low
distortion. Figure 2-1 shows the graph of IMD characteristics and Figure 2-2
shows the graph of harmonic spurious characteristics. Superior distortion
characteristics and clean signals are acquired in this way.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

11

.
2 TRANSMISSION

Figure 2-1 Transmit IMD Characteristics

Figure 2-2 Transmit Spurious Characteristics

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
2 TRANSMISSION

2.2 High-speed Relay-controlled Antenna Tuner

TS-590S has a built-in high-speed relay-controlled antenna tuner that was first
employed in the TS-570S. In contrast to the variable capacitor type antenna
tuner, it employs a small and lightweight relay to achieve a sufficient
matching range and a fast tuning operation with digital control. The control
speed has been further accelerated over previous models. When you return to a
previously used operating band or frequency, the antenna tuner easily and
quickly re-tunes.

2.3 REMOTE Connector

The transceiver has a REMOTE connector that has the same pin assignment and
specifications as on previous models.

Pin 6 is the ALC terminal. When you use a linear amplifier or transverter, we
recommend you connect the external accessory device to the ALC terminal in
order to control the output to be within an appropriate range.

The ALC signal is a signal to shift the voltage in the minus direction (in
Kenwood’s devices) when the output level requires regulation to satisfy the
requirements of the external accessory device. Generally external accessory
devices have a VR for adjusting the voltage. In the TS-590S, a negative voltage
(approximately -10 V) is applied to the ALC terminal to decrease the internal
gain.

As well, for the purpose of controlling a linear amplifier and other external device, the transceiver is
equipped with a relay output terminal and an RL terminal (Pin 7) to which an approximately 12 V
voltage is output. The relay output and RL terminal output are coordinated with internal controls and
can be adjusted in the linear amplifier control setting menu No. 53 (HF bands) or No. 54 (50 MHz band).
Table 2-1 describes the possible settings of the menu, and Figure 2-3 and Figure 2-4 provide the timing
charts.

If using equipment that is not designed for full break-in and requires a delay
for internal switchover, such as TL-922, select “3”. In this way, you can
increase the delay between the case when the transceiver is switched to
transmit and the case when the signal is actually sent out. Note; however, if
the full break-in setting is selected in CW mode (and if the delay time is set
to “FBK”), the transmit start time cannot be delayed.

Table 2-1 Setting Menu of Linear Amplifier Control

Linear Amplifier Controls
Setting Control of Linear
Amplifier (RL terminal)
Control of Relay (COM/
BRK/MKE terminals) Transmit Start Delay Time
OFF OFF OFF 10 ms

  1. ON OFF 10 ms
  2. ON ON 10 ms
  3. ON ON 25 ms

TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
2 TRANSMISSION

Menu No. 53 or No. 54 "1 or 2"

10 ms
KEY
RX
RL
Switch
TX
RF Power

AF

 

Figure 2-3 Timing chart (1 or 2)

Menu No. 53 or No. 54 "3"

25 ms
Switch
KEY
RX
RL
TX
RF Power


AF


Figure 2-4 Timing chart (3)


CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
2 TRANSMISSION

2.4 DRV Terminal

TS-590S is equipped with a DRV terminal that formerly was provided only for
high-end transceivers.

The output level of the DRV terminal is about 0 dBm (1 mW) and can be decreased
to around 1/20 depending on the setting of the transmit power. To reduce the
output level further, you can adjust the transmit power also by the carrier
level in CW, FSK and AM modes or by the microphone gain or processor output
level in SSB mode. The output level of the signal from the terminal is too low
to be transmitted as is, but by connecting a high-gain linear amplifier, the
signal can be used for operation in the 135 kHz band or for operation with a
transverter. Figure 2-5 through Figure 2-7 show the spurious characteristics
when using the signal from the DRV terminal in the 14 MHz band and Figure 2-8
through Figure 2-10 show the spurious characteristics in the 135 kHz band. If
the output level is 0 dBm in the 135 kHz band, the harmonics increase slightly;
therefore, you need to place an LPF after the amplifier or in some other way
eliminate the harmonics. Also, lowering the setting of the transmit output
level or limiting the output level at the DRV terminal by entering the ALC
signal will also contribute to reduce distortion.


Figure 2-5 Output Characteristics of DRV Terminal at 14.175 MHz and 0 dBm

TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
2 TRANSMISSION

Figure 2-6 Output Characteristics of DRV Terminal at 14.175 MHz and -10 dBm

Figure 2-7 Output Characteristics of DRV Terminal at 14.175 MHz and -20 dBm

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
2 TRANSMISSION

Figure 2-8 Output Characteristics of DRV Terminal at 136 kHz and 0 dBm

Figure 2-9 Output Characteristics of DRV Terminal at 136 kHz and -10 dBm

TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
2 TRANSMISSION

Figure 2-10 Output Characteristics of DRV Terminal at 136 kHz and -20 dBm

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
3 LOCAL OSCILLATOR

In the first local oscillator, instead of the conventional PLL/VCO system, a
14-bit DDS (direct digital synthesizer) is adopted to provide the output signal
directly to the mixer. During the down conversion, the oscillator frequency is
lower than that in up-conversion operation, and, therefore, the output has far
better C/N (carrier-to-noise ratio) characteristics that contribute to superior
reciprocal mixing*1 characteristics. *1 Reciprocal mixing: First, the signal
sourced from a signal generator (SG) at a frequency far from the receive
frequency is injected. Then, the output level of the signal generator is
changed to measure the level at which the signal is detected as noise. The
higher the value, the lower the noise that is produced due to adjacent
undesired signals occurring and therefore quieter reception is possible.
Figure 3-1 Comparison: C/N Characteristics Figure 3-1 is a graph to compare the
measurement results of TS-590S and of TS-480S at 14.200 MHz. For example, at
the 10 kHz point, if the receive frequency is 14.200 MHz, an unmodulated
carrier signal of 14.210 MHz is supplied from a signal generator to the antenna
terminal of the transceiver. In the TS-480S, if the output level from the
signal generator reaches -45 dBm, the noise level starts to rise. However, in
the TS-590S, you can see the noise level goes up if the signal sourced from the
signal generator is raised to -25 dBm. Figure 3-2 shows a graph of C/N
characteristics plotting the data measured at the TS-590S’s first local
oscillator. C/N characteristics of the first local oscillatorwhen receiving
14.2 MHz 1 kHz -116.5 dBc/ Hz 10 kHz -134.4 dBc/ Hz100 kHz -142.5 dBc/ Hz 3


TS-590S

CONTENTS

19

.
4 DSP

Figure 4-1 describes the DSP*1 of the TS-590S and peripheral devices connected to the DSP
including ADCs*2 and DACs*3 .

4.1 Multipurpose 32-bit Floating Point DSP
ADC
AK5385B
DAC
AK4382A
DAC
AK4387
DAC
AK4387
ADC
WM8782
FLASH
MEMORY
VGS..AO
MIC
RIF/DET
ANI/USB..AI
µ com
AF
TIF/MOD
ANO
VGS..AI
USB..ANO
AGCV
DSP
TMS320C6726B
221.184 MHz
4 DSP

Figure 4-1 describes the DSP*1 of the TS-590S and peripheral devices connected
to the DSP including ADCs*2 and DACs*3 .

4.1 Multipurpose 32-bit Floating Point DSP
ADC
AK5385B
DAC
AK4382A
DAC
AK4387
DAC
AK4387
ADC
WM8782
FLASH
MEMORY
VGS..AO
MIC
RIF/DET
ANI/USB..AI
µ com
AF
TIF/MOD
ANO
VGS..AI
USB..ANO
AGCV
DSP
TMS320C6726B
221.184 MHz

*1 DSP: digital signal processor
*2 ADC: A/D converter
*3 DAC: D/A converter

The heart of the signal processing function is a 32-bit floating point
TMS320C6726B DSP from Texas Instruments Incorporated (Figure 4-2) and it is
operated at the clock frequency of 221 MHz.

For ADCs placed at the receive IF signal input and the microphone input, 24-bit
.SADC AK5385Bs from AKM Semiconductor, Incorporated are placed, and for DACs
placed at the transmit IF signal output and at the audio output, 24-bit .SDAC
AK4382As also from AKM Semiconductor, Incorporated are placed. For other
applications such as at the external terminals, USB audio, and audio input to
and output from the optional VSG-1, 24-bit .SADCs and .SDACs are implemented.
All these converters are operated at the sampling frequency of 96 kHz.


20

CONTENTS
TS-590S

.
4 DSP

As for ADCs and DACs, the best combination of models are selected to suit the
type of signal processed, especially for the IF input section, high-performance
ADCs designed for high-end audio with dynamic range of 114 dB are used.

Both the ADCs and DACs have two analog input/output channels per device and the
DSP has four input channels and six output channels of signals. As indicated
above, the DSP processes many signals concurrently. This delivers a wide
variety of benefits including the capability to independently set volume levels
of speakers, signal levels from external terminals and USB audio, and to
trigger the VOX circuit through the microphone and the external terminal at the
same time.

However, handling so many signals simultaneously puts a heavy load on the
32-bit floating point DSP, though it operates at the clock frequency of 221
MHz. The DSP needs to be able to handle many different signals, while
performing not only basic functions including IF-AGC, digital IF filtering, and
demodulation, but also more advanced functions such as noise reduction and
manual notch filtering. To achieve this goal, we have introduced a real-time
OS to the DSP of the TS-590S and also paid careful attention to the software
configuration to help deliver utmost performance from the OS.

The DSP of TS-590S realizes a variety of functions with its signal processing
software that is optimized to fully bring out the performance of the
high-performance hardware of the transceiver. In the following sections, we
will explain the functions made possible with the innovative DSP signal
processing technologies.

4.2 Advanced AGC Control via IF Digital Processing

After TS-2000S, Kenwood has not launched an HF amateur transceiver
incorporating “IF-DSP” that processes digital signals from the IF stage. Still,
over the years, we continued to study signal processing technology using DSP.
From the inception, we reviewed our design approach. Now, in the new TS-590S,
we have introduced the latest DSP technology that we developed from scratch.

TS-590S has adopted a unique frequency configuration where down conversion and
up conversion are switched over each other depending on the conditions and this
was never used in previous models. In either case, the pass bandwidth of the
earlier stage (analog stage) can be wider than the final pass bandwidth of the
DSP. Even under such conditions, the target signal is not affected by an
interfering signal thanks to the sophisticated digital AGC control.

Also, we have further perfected the “high quality audio” that users rely on
Kenwood to deliver and has attracted so many users to previous product
generations. To produce audio signals that a user never gets tired of hearing
during the long periods of operation, we have developed a new attack control
process of the IF-AGC. The attack control of the IF-AGC in the DSP is tuned to
produce a very rapid change in gain and to minimize the distortion during the
attack period, and the waveform of the audio output is expected to be shaped
into a form of overshoot during the period from the moment of the attack to the
moment when the gain stabilizes.

In practice, little distortion is audible in the voice output, but in CW mode,
depending on how the waveform is shaped by the attack operation, the CW receive
note may crackle somewhat. And that tires the operator over a long operating
period.

TS-590S incorporates newly developed functions such as the mentioned IF-AGC and
other improvements of conventional features. During the development, a signal
process simulator was employed to ensure performance enhancement.

When prototyping the TS-590S, we created and implemented two types of IF-AGCs
experimentally and conducted testing. As a result of this experimental process,
we discussed the influence of distortion on the audio quality, to finally
decide to adopt the IF-AGC configuration described in Figure 4-3.


TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
4 DSP

Figure 4-3 Control Block Diagram of IF-AGC

In the attack control circuit, in addition to the normal fast gain shift
function, we have added a technology to capture the signal transformation in an
overshoot form and to apply moderate gain to the signal in order to lessen the
audible clicks. As an example, Figure 4-4 provides a comparison between the
audio waveform of a CW signal controlled by the conventional AGC attack control
and by the AGC attack control of the TS-590S.

Figure 4-4 CW Receive Waveforms: Comparing Conventional and TS-590S’s Attack Control

The receive audio quality of the TS-590S has been highly evaluated since its
launch, and this level of quality has not been achieved only by the audio
characteristics and hardware elements such as the speaker, but also the digital
AGC control characteristics realized by the latest technologies have also
substantially contributed.

Even now the IF-AGC continues to be examined and enhanced daily for further
improvements of the receive audio quality.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
4 DSP

4.3 Interference Elimination Within AGC Loop

TS-590S also incorporates rich and powerful interference elimination functions
that work within the IF-AGC loop (Figure 4-3).

The previous model (TS-2000S) already featured a digital IF filter and the auto
notch filter function, and in the TS-590S, a digital noise blanker (NB2) and a
manual notch filter function*1 have been added.

These functions within the AGC loop eliminate interference to make a weak
target signal emerge clearly. *1 The auto notch filter and manual notch filter
cannot be used at the same time.

4.3.1 Digital IF Filter

The digital IF filter of the TS-590S consists of slope tuning combining an IIR
(infinite impulse response) LPF and an IIR HPF in SSB mode, of WIDTH/SHIFT
using an IIR BPF in CW, FSK and SSB-DATA modes, and of an FIR (finite impulse
response) BPF in AM mode. (In FM mode, since an FM detection IC is used, the
signal at the IF stage is not processed by the DSP. Instead, the demodulated
audio signal is processed by an AF filter.)

The attenuation of the filter used in SSB, CW, FSK and SSB-DATA modes is set to
110 dB and the filter slope is constantly sharp regardless of the setting of
the slope tuning or of the WIDTH. Meanwhile, because the IF frequency has been
raised, the filter’s own group delay characteristics are improved and the
influence of the group delay is minimized even when a LO CUT frequency (HPF)
that is close to the carrier point is selected in the SSB mode.

Figure 4-5 Results of Amplitude and Frequency Analysis of the Digital IF Filter
(SSB Mode)

In CW, FSK and SSB-DATA modes, a BPF with bandwidth of as narrow as 50 Hz can
be selected, but the group delay curve shows relatively large spectral
excursions around the cut-off frequency. By inserting an additional group delay
compensation filter, we have decreased the delay of the filter as a whole to
obtain usable characteristics and to take advantage of the fast response of the
IF-AGC.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
4 DSP

Figure 4-6 Results of Amplitude and Frequency Analysis of the Digital IF Filter
(CW Mode) 0 Hz in the center that corresponds to the pitch frequency


4.3.2 Types of Digital IF Filters

The following table provides possible choices of the filters and the default
value (shown in bold) for respective modes.

SSB Mode
LOW CUT 0 Hz, 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz, 300 Hz, 400 Hz, 500 Hz, 600 Hz, 700 Hz,
800 Hz, 900 Hz, 1000 Hz
HI CUT 1.0 kHz, 1.2 kHz, 1.4 kHz, 1.6 kHz, 1.8 kHz, 2.0 kHz, 2.2 kHz, 2.4 kHz,
2.6 kHz, 2.8 kHz, 3.0 kHz, 3.4 kHz, 4.0 kHz, 5.0 kHz

CW Mode
WIDTH 50 Hz, 80 Hz, 100 Hz, 150 Hz, 200 Hz, 250 Hz, 300 Hz, 400 Hz, 500 Hz,
600 Hz, 1000 Hz, 1500 Hz, 2000 Hz, 2500 Hz

SHIFT Between 300 Hz and 1 kHz (in steps of 50 Hz), default value 800 Hz

SSB-DATA Mode
WIDTH 50 Hz, 80 Hz, 100 Hz, 150 Hz, 200 Hz, 250 Hz, 300 Hz, 400 Hz, 500 Hz,
600 Hz, 1000 Hz, 1500 Hz, 2000 Hz, 2500 Hz
SHIFT 1000 Hz, 1100 Hz, 1200 Hz, 1300 Hz, 1400 Hz, 1500 Hz, 1600 Hz,
1700 Hz, 1800 Hz, 1900 Hz, 2000 Hz, 2100 Hz, 2210 Hz

AM mode (LOW CUT
filters are AF filters)
LOW CUT 0 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz, 300 Hz
HI CUT 2.5 kHz, 3.0 kHz, 4.0 kHz, 5.0 kHz

FSK Mode WIDTH 250 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 1500 Hz

FM mode (AF filters)
LOW CUT 0 Hz, 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz, 300 Hz, 400 Hz, 500 Hz, 600 Hz, 700 Hz,
800 Hz, 900 Hz, 1000 Hz

HI CUT 1.0 kHz, 1.2 kHz, 1.4 kHz, 1.6 kHz, 1.8 kHz, 2.0 kHz, 2.2 kHz, 2.4 kHz,
2.6 kHz, 2.8 kHz, 3.0 kHz, 3.4 kHz, 4.0 kHz, 5.0 kHz

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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4 DSP

4.3.3 Manual Notch Filter and Auto Notch Filter

The manual notch filter is a notch filter with a frequency that can be shifted
with the notch knob. The auto notch filter is a notch filter that automatically
tracks a beat frequency with an adaptive filter technique. Both notch filters
have the attenuation of more than 60 dB at the center frequency. Figure 4-7
describes how a weak signal emerges by the operation of AGC when the manual
notch filter eliminates an interfering signal in the power spectrum.


Figure 4-7 Clear Weak Signal by Eliminating Interference with Manual Notch Filter
(from above, Disabled to be Enabled)

TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
4 DSP

There are two settings on the manual notch filter: Normal and Wide. You can
choose one of two bandwidths for the notch filter (Figure 4-8). For a simple
beat frequency, Normal is effective. If there is an interfering SSB signal, or
in the event the target signal is also trimmed by LO CUT/ HI CUT, a Wide
setting of the Notch filter used in combination with LO CUT/HI CUT may be
effective.

Figure 4-8 Results of Amplitude and Frequency Analysis of the Manual Notch
Filter

The shifting of the notch frequency with the notch knob is not actually done by
switching the notch filters depending on the knob position. In fact, within the
DSP, the notch filter frequency is fixed and the frequency shift is made
possible by altering the IF signal frequency.

The auto notch filter inherited from the TS-2000S and the TS-870S also has been
improved to deliver better capability to track the beat frequency. The enhanced
notch filter has good effect even on a relatively weak beat signal. The auto
notch filter is sharper, like a needle, than the manual notch filter and can
minimize the impact of the notch on the audio.

4.3.4 Digital Noise Blanker (NB2)

Refer to 4.6.2 Noise Blanker NB2 (IF Processing).

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
4 DSP

4.4 Demodulation

For the demodulation of the RX signal in SSB, CW, FSK and SSB-DATA modes, we
have employed the proven PSN (Phase Shift Network) design again.

In the previous models (TS-2000S and TS-870S), the selection of the PSN’s
characteristics was interlocked with the passband setting of the IF filter, and
when the passband is narrow, a PSN with a good sideband suppression was
selected.

On the other hand, on the TS-590S, the order of the PSN is decreased by tuning
the PSN only to the opposite side band that was not fully removed by the
digital IF filter.

In this way, the low frequency range of the PSN stretches out substantially and
the poor group delay characteristics in the lower frequency range, which is a
drawback of a PSN, is also improved. As a result, the low range reaches farther
with less attenuation than that reached in the previous models.

In SSB mode, the digital IF filter has a setting of “0 Hz” in LO CUT and this
means the cutoff frequency is set to the carrier point so that the low
frequency range can be stretched out maximally. Enjoy distinctly different
audio from that of previous transceivers.

The same demodulation process is used in SSB, CW FSK and SSB-DATA modes, except
that the selection of PSN characteristics and of digital IF filters varies
depending on the mode.

In AM mode, an absolute value detection circuit is used for demodulation as in
the previous models.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

.
4 DSP

4.5 Modulation

Following is how the TX signal is processed. The audio signal captured from the
microphone or an external terminal is first processed by the bandwidth-limiting
filter, microphone gain control, speech processor or VOX, and then, in SSB and
AM modes, the signal is modulated and output as an IF signal; in FM mode, a
CTCSS tone signal is added.

In CW mode, the waveform of the keying input is shaped and then the signal is
multiplied by the modulating carrier to be transmitted as an IF signal. At the
same time, the signal is multiplied by a carrier for monitoring to produce a CW
sidetone.

In FSK mode, the keying input is processed by a baseband filter for bandwidth
limiting, and then the signal is processed by frequency modulation with the 24
kHz center frequency to obtain an FSK modulated wave. As in CW mode, for the
purpose of monitoring, the audio center frequency based on the FSK tone
frequency setting in the menu mode is processed by frequency modulation to
obtain the monitoring audio.

In SSB mode, the proven PSN design continues to be adopted for modulation.
Unlike for demodulation, for modulation enough sideband suppression must be
provided for the bandwidth of the modulation input. The characteristics of the
PSN are designed to deliver sufficient suppression according to the
characteristics of the bandwidth-limiting filter (Figure 4-9).


Figure 4-9 Opposite Sideband Suppression Characteristics of the PSN for SSB Modulation

The bandwidth-limiting filter for transmission that can be set in the menu mode
is applied to SSB and AM modes, but in SSB mode the filter is made sharper at 3
kHz.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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4 DSP

4.6 DSP-based Auxiliary Circuits (for RX)

4.6.1 Beat Cancel (AF Processing)

Beat cancel (BC), as its name implies, is designed to cancel unpleasant beat
interference. Like NR1 (line enhancer), BC uses adaptive filter technology.
With this technology BC tracks and cancels a beat signal just like shaping a
band elimination filter.

BC is especially effective when there are multiple beats that are equivalent to
or lower in strength than the target signal. The adaptive filter can
self-adjust its characteristics while tracking multiple beats and effectively
cancel them.


Figure 4-10 Beat Cancel

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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4 DSP

Figure 4-10 shows how BC cancels beat signals, as monitored by an FFT analyzer. Notice how
multiple beats are clearly removed by BC.

There are two methods available for beat cancellation: BC1 and BC2. BC1 is
tuned to be effective against weak or continuous beat interference, while BC2
cancels intermittent beats such as a CW signal. Note that since BC is designed
to remove beats, it does not function in CW mode.

BC is a signal process method at the AF stage. Therefore, if there is a beat
signal in proximity that is stronger than the target signal, BC effectively
removes the beat interference from the audio output, but in the event the AGC
is activated by the beat signal, the target signal is suppressed when received.

In such an occasion, the auto notch or manual notch filter that works at the IF
stage is more effective.

4.6.2 Noise Blanker NB2 (IF Processing)

We explained in the section of RX circuity that TS-590S is equipped with two
noise blankers, NB1 and NB2, and that NB2 is a digital noise blanker based on
the DSP. In the following section, we will explain NB2 in detail.

A noise blanker is designed to remove pulse noise at the IF stage to reveal the
target signal suppressed by the AGC that was activated by the pulse noise. In
addition to the analog noise blanker (NB1), the TS-590S is equipped with a
newly developed digital noise blanker (NB2) so that the user can choose the
blanker that is more effective for the type of noise encountered and the RX
conditions.

NB2 employs a newly developed envelope tracking method, making it effective
against noise that defies the tracking of the analog noise blanker (NB1).

Unlike the analog noise blanker, the procedure of NB2 is not a simple blanking
of pulse noises from the target signal. NB2 removes pulse noises by tracking
the RX signal level to automatically detect pulses and comparing the level of
the pulses and of the target signal excluding the pulses to attenuate the pulse
parts appropriately. Hence, even a long pulse can be processed without
seriously degrading the target signal.

Figure 4-11 shows the time waveform of a signal containing pulse noises and a CW signal while NB2
is inactive, and Figure 4-12 shows the time waveform of the same signal while NB2 is active.

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Figure 4-11 NB2: Inactive

Figure 4-12 NB2: Active

However, depending on the nature of the pulse noise, the noise blanker cannot suppress the noise
effectively. In such a case, by using other methods such as noise reduction in
conjunction, the reception conditions may be improved.


4.6.3 Overview of Noise Reduction

There are two methods available for noise reduction on TS-590S: NR1 and NR2. You can select the
noise reduction that is more effective depending on the operation mode and
reception conditions.

NR1 has different algorithms that operate according to the operation mode: in
voice modes (SSB, FM and AM), a newly developed noise reduction method
featuring audio signals based on spectral subtraction is used. In non-voice
modes (CW and FSK), noise reduction is based on a line enhancer using an
adaptive filter that emphasizes the periodic signal. The noise reduction is
automatically switched over when an operation mode is selected.

On the other hand, NR2 employs what is known as SPAC (speech processing by auto
correlation) to piece together only the periodic components detected from the
RX signal and to produce the result as audio output. Table 4-1 provides the
relationship between the RX modes and NR algorithms used.

Table 4-1 Reception Modes and NR Algorithms Used

Noise Reduction
Receive Mode
SSB/ SSB DATA FM/ AM CW/ FSK
NR1 Spectral subtraction Spectral subtraction Line enhancer
NR2 SPAC SPAC SPAC

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4.6.4 NR1 (Spectral Subtraction Method) (AF Processing)

Unlike the conventional noise reduction methods, the spectral subtraction
method of NR1 is a brand new approach of noise reduction developed for the
TS-590S. NR1 estimates the noise component and takes away (subtracts) the
estimated noise component from the RX signal to make the target signal emerge
(Figure 4-13).

This method was developed with a focus on improving the intelligibility of a
weak SSB signal. Compared with conventional NR1 (based on a line enhancer),
audio output with minimized degradation of audio quality, while higher-pitched
components are affected less, is obtained while noise is effectively reduced.
In developing NR1 based on spectral subtraction, a new technology has been
invented to reduce the introduction of musical noise (tonal “blip blip” sound)
that is inherently generated by spectral subtraction. Hence, the production of
musical noise in the spectral subtraction has been substantially suppressed.

Figure 4-13 Conceptual Scheme of NR1 Based on Spectral Subtraction

The new spectral subtraction-based NR1 allows selection of the NR effect level
more smoothly than the conventional NR1 method. Use the effect level of your
choice according to the receive conditions.

Note, however, since the noise estimation process of the spectral subtraction
NR1 identifies any steady sound as a noise component, beat interference or a CW
signal is also judged as a target of noise reduction. Meanwhile, the
conventional noise reduction (based on a line enhancer) functions to emphasize
beat interference or a CW signal. Because the new spectral subtraction-based
NR1 is not intended for elimination of a CW signal or beat interference, you
cannot expect a noticeable effect against those signals. To remove beat
interference or a CW signal, use beat cancel (BC) instead. Below you can see
the result of frequency analysis conducted on the receive audio containing an
audio signal while NR1 is inactive in Figure 4-14 and the result while NR1 is
active in Figure 4-15.

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Audio spectrum components swamped by noise
Figure 4-14 NR1 (Spectral Subtraction Method) (Inactive)

Audio spectrum components extracted by NR
Figure 4-15 NR1 (Spectral Subtraction Method) (Active)

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4.6.5 NR1 (Based on a Line Enhancer) (AF Processing)

As a noise suppression process, the line enhancer method based on a DSP has
been adopted by many amateur radio transceivers in recent years. This method
automatically adjusts the filter characteristics according to the
characteristics of a RX signal to obtain filter characteristics suitable for
passing periodic signals such as a CW signal. Because the process automatically
passes and emphasizes periodic signals, it is called a line enhancer (line
spectrum enhancer). Since the degradation of receive audio is small, a line
enhancer is an easy-to-use, engineer-friendly technique. For the TS-590S, we
have reviewed part of the NR1 process and succeeded in drastically improving
the noise reduction capability compared with previous models. Below you can see
the result of frequency analysis conducted on the receive audio containing a
sine wave while NR1 (based on a line enhancer) is inactive in Figure 4-16 and
the result while NR1 is active in Figure 4-17.

Target signal
Figure 4-16 NR1 (Line Enhancer Method) (Inactive)

Target signal
Figure 4-17 NR1 (Line Enhancer Method) (Active)

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4.6.6 NR2 (AF Processing)

NR2 is what is known as SPAC. It detects periodic signals contained in the RX
signal and pieces together the detected periodic signals to produce output
receive audio. As a result, only the periodic signals in the receive audio
emerge clearly.

NR1 based on an NR1 line enhancer is a filter in essence, but NR2 processes a
RX signal in a different approach. Hence, NR2 is very effective against a
signal consisting of a single frequency such as a CW signal. Also, since the
processing method tends to detect the rising of a signal quickly, it also
delivers an effect to make the attack part of a CW signal more distinguishable.

Hence, NR2 is a very beneficial function for CW operations. However, due to its
operating principle, in the case of less periodic signals such as voice, it may
generate some noise where periodic signals are joined and, thereafter, the
audio quality may become less clear. In actual operation, we recommend you use
NR1 in SSB mode and choose between NR1 and NR2 depending on circumstances in CW
mode.

For NR2, a user can set the autocorrelation time between 2 and 20 ms that aids
greatly in detecting periodic signals. The optimum autocorrelation time setting
differs depending on the receive conditions, including the frequency of the
target signal contained in the RX signal and noise conditions. Try to find the
best autocorrelation time setting while actually receiving a signal.

Below, you can see the result of frequency analysis conducted on the receive
audio containing a sine wave while NR2 is inactive in Figure 4-18 and the
result while NR2 is active in Figure 4-19.

Target signal
Figure 4-18 NR2: Inactive

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Target signal
Figure 4-19 NR2: Active

4.7 DSP-based Auxiliary Circuits (for TX)

4.7.1 Speech Processor (AF Processing)

TS-590S also incorporates an AF-type speech processor. Though it is an AF type,
the speech processor provides sufficient compression through a unique signal
processing technique.

A typical voice signal tends to have the highest amplitude in the low frequency
range with smaller amplitude as the frequency range increases. That is the
reason why distortion is likely to occur in the low range while excessive
compression processing is used. On the TS-590S, signal processing is conducted
to reduce the difference in amplitude between the low and high range when
compression is performed. As a result, the speech processor can raise the talk
power while minimizing rasping distorted sounds.

Besides, since the relatively emphasized high range has an effect of raising
the intelligibility of the voice, the speech processor has now become an
effective feature to receive a reply in a pileup.


Figure 4-20 Speech Processor (Active/Inactive)

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Figure 4-20 shows how the waveform changes when the speech processor is toggled between active
and inactive.

You can see that when the speech processor is activated, the differences in
amplitude are averaged and the talk power is increased.

The speech processor has two settings: HARD and SOFT.

HARD is a setting that you choose so as to increase talk power while tolerating
some distortion and SOFT is a setting to minimize rasping distorted audio.
Select either of the two settings according to your predilection and
operational circumstances.

4.8 DSP-based Auxiliary Circuits (Common to TX/RX)

4.8.1 TX Equalizer & RX Equalizer (AF Processing)

If you use the RX equalizer (RX EQ), you can easily adjust RX audio quality.
Pick your quality of choice from the preset curves: high boost, formant pass,
bass boost, and flat.

Likewise, TX audio quality can be adjusted with the TX equalizer (TX EQ). It is
easy to make changes to suit your taste of TX audio quality: for example,
correcting microphone characteristics or applying compensation to match the
characteristics of your own voice.

Also, on the TS-590S, with the ARCP-590 provided on the Kenwood Web page, you
can adjust the settings in the 18-band graphic equalizer offered in its Audio
Equalizer window (Figure 4-21). This function offers you more diverse options
for equalizing.

Any adjustments made in the Audio Equalizer window of ARCP-590 are reflected in the TS-590S in
real-time. Meanwhile, the equalization done while “User” is selected is stored on the TS-590S.

Typical graphic equalizers used in audio devices divide the spectrum into octave segments. In
contrast, the equalizer on the TS-590S divides the spectrum into multiples of 300 Hz to allow the
insertion of a notch at a particular frequency and precise reproduction of complex frequency analysis
results.


Figure 4-21 ARCP-590 Audio Equalizer Window

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5 SOFTWARE: ENHANCING OPERATING PLEASURE

5.1 Extended Data-mode Related Functions

We have modified data-mode related settings to meet many different needs.

Figure 5-1 Front Panel of the TS-590S

In SSB-DATA and FM-DATA modes, the On/Off settings of the speech processor and
the settings of DSP filters are stored independently of the normal SSB and FM
modes. Hence, you can conveniently switch between the data mode operation and
the normal mode operation with a single touch of a button.

Also, now that USB audio functions*1 accept external audio input/output,
operations in combination with a PC have become more convenient. The audio
output of the TS-590S can be easily delivered to a PC simply by connecting the
transceiver and the PC using a single USB cable. If you select “USB” in “Audio
input line selection for data communications” of Menu 63, you can transmit
using an audio source from a PC.

The transmit command is given with the PC control command of “TX1;”. During an
operation using ARCP-590, in the “Setup TX Control” of the Tool pulldown menu,
select “USB” as the modulation line. To transmit via key operation, assign
“DATA SEND” to the PF key in menu mode. It is also possible to transmit using
the PKS signal in the ACC2 connector as before. Furthermore, by enabling the
“Data VOX” function in Menu 69, a transmission can be made automatically using
an external signal.

*1
The USB audio interface has latency (signal delay) due to a limitation
resulting from the specifications. So a USB device may not be used for a
latency-critical application.

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Also, in data modes, the specification of the receive DSP filter is
automatically switched from LO CUT/HI CUT to WIDTH/SHIFT, allowing for
operations with non-voice modulation types such as RTTY and PSK31.

Therefore, the IF DSP filter can be adjusted to as narrow as 50 Hz in SSB-DATA mode to deliver an
interference-free output.

Setting values of WIDTH and SHIFT in SSB-DATA mode. (Hatched blocks are default
values.)

Setting values of WIDTH [Hz] (14 steps)

50 80 100 150 200 250 300 400 500 600 1000 1500 2000 2500

Setting values of SHIFT [Hz] (13 steps)

1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 2100 2210

Hints and Tips

“Considerations on modulating the signal using an audio input from the PC”

If modulating the signal using an external audio input via the USB or ACC2
connector, and transmitting with the [SEND] key or the SS terminal of the ACC2
connector, the signal will not be modulated.

Conversely, if transmitting with the PKS signal of the ACC2 connector, PC
control command “TX1;” or “DATA SEND” of the PF key, the signal from the
microphone jack cannot be used to modulate the transceiver.

This is due to the specification that stipulates when a microphone and an
external modulation source are connected at the same time, the external
modulation input is muted if transmitting using the microphone, and the
microphone is muted if the external modulation source is used.

Thanks to this specification, when you operate in PSK31 mode from your PC, for
example, you don’t have to disconnect the microphone each time.

5.2 Drive Out

TS-590S is equipped with a DRV connector. The connector allows access to the
drive output during the transmission. The drive output level is about 1 mW (0
dBm) and for operation in the 135 kHz band this output is used for
transmission.

Also, since the active or inactive state of the DRV is stored for each band, you can interlock the status
with the RX ANT connector to handily run a transverter.

Note:

Accessory/additional equipment

If you connect accessory equipment (such as an external TNC, SSTV equipment,
RTTY equipment or when you connect the USB port and a PC for data
communication) or additional equipment (such as a transverter or a linear
amplifier) to the TS-590S, be aware that the transceiver is no longer eligible
for Technical Regulations Conformity Certification and that you need to have
the equipment certified to make an application. For a sample application form,
visit our web site “TS-590S USB Audio Setting Manual”.

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Figure 5-2 DRV and RX ANT Connectors

Operation in the 135 kHz Band

Since the Technical Regulations Conformity Certification of the transceiver is
invalid for operation in the 135 kHz band, you need to make a separate
application for certification to work this band.

  • Higher-level knowledge and skills are required to connect external equipment to the transceiver.
  • If you use external equipment, be fully aware of the connector

specifications, possible loop interference, and other relevant issues.

5.3 Single Button Toggles IF Filters between A and B

For use of the legendary slope tuning and WIDTH/SHIFT functions incorporated in
successive Kenwood HF transceivers, TS-590S stores the status of two filters
(FILTER A and FILTER B) set for each type of signal. Hence, you can easily
switch between the filters with a single touch of a button.


Figure 5-3 [IF FIL] Key

As an example, store the setting of a wide IF filter and narrow IF filter in
FILTER A and FILTER B respectively. When you look for a station for a contact,
use the wider FILTER A and once you have started a QSO, switch to the narrower
FILTER B, with a touch of a button, to be able to receive the target signal
only .

Hints and Tips

“Is this filter switchover with a single touch of a button different from NAR?”

This filter switchover with a single action is based on the way the NAR function was used in the days
when analog IF filters were used. Continuously, variable bandwidth is convenient in the sense that
you can adjust it freely to whatever value you choose, but you may have difficulty operating in a
timely manner in a contest or similar because it does not allow a jump to a certain value
instantaneously, Therefore, we considered introducing a mechanism equivalent to the previous NAR
function, but we were swayed by the opinion that a user wants to operate with normal bandwidth
usually, yet still maintain the to switch to a wider bandwidth when it is required. Consequently, to
satisfy both needs, we have devised a system to store settings freely.

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5.4 Double Function Keys and Hold Time Selection

Just like the TS-480S, TS-590S employs double function keys to activate
different functions by holding down a key. This is meant to make operation
easier than in the system requiring one to push a function key first before
hitting another key to invoke the desired function.

Since for most of the keys, functions related to the original functions of the
keys are assigned, they can be used intuitively.

Examples: NB key and variable NB level, the NOTCH key and NOTCH WIDTH selection, etc.

Additionally, the hold time to activate another function can be switched in
three stages. By default about 0.5 seconds is selected, but you can switch
between about 0.2 seconds, and about 1 second as necessary.

5.5 Mode Selection of Built-in Electronic Keyer

The transceivers in the previous generations were equipped with an electronic
keyer in which dots and dashes are always memorized for output. On the TS-590S,
we have employed an electronic keyer which allows a user to select either of
the conventional keyers, which is called “Mode B”, or a newly adopted “Mode A”
which has different memory timings. If you experience the problem of producing
an extra dot or dash in “Mode B”, try “Mode A” and you may find you are able to
send more accurately with greater ease.

5.6 Switchover of Shift Frequency Interlocked with Change of Pitch Frequency

On the transceivers in the previous generations, after a user chose and set a
pitch frequency, they then manually changed the shift frequency, but on the
TS-590S, when the pitch frequency is changed on the menu, the shift frequency
is also altered accordingly.

5.7 Power-on Message

The transceiver can be configured to display a maximum of 8 characters
(alphanumeric characters and some symbols) on the 13-segment display on the
right side of the display screen during the powerup. As the factory default,
the string “KENWOOD” is set to be displayed.


Figure 5-4 Power-on Message

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5.8 Quick Memory Function

The TS-590S comes with a quick memory function as did with the previous
transceivers. The number of channels is a maximum of 5 as default, but you can
increase the number up to 10 by setting in the menu mode. Conversely, if you
wish to decrease the number of channels to make the operation quicker, it is
possible to limit the number to 3. You can also scan all the quick memory
channels or erase the channels at one time.


Figure 5-5 [Q-M.IN]/[Q-MR] Key

5.9 Cross Tone Function

Among the functions newly employed in FM mode is the cross tone function. This
function allows a user to set separately the encode tone frequency, which is
added when CTCSS is transmitted, and the decode tone frequency added when CTCSS
is received. This function is meant to be used when you use a repeater where
tone frequencies of uplink and downlink are different.

5.10 PF Keys

The TS-590S incorporates two PF keys instead of the conventional one to enhance
user convenience. Some functions can be assigned only to the PF keys, so as to
use the PF keys as required by the operational circumstances.

Examples of functions that can be assigned only to the PF keys:

• DATA SEND function:
When modulating the signal using the ACC2 or USB audio input located on the
transceiver’s rear panel, modulation signals other than those at these
microphone connectors are muted, whereas there is no modulation with the audio
input through the connectors on the rear panel if a transmission is made with
the [SEND] key on the front panel. In such a case, it is convenient to assign
DATA SEND function to the PF key.

• TX TUNE function:
A continuous carrier with a certain output level can be sent out regardless of
the current settings of mode or transmit output level. This function is very
convenient for tuning a screwdriver type antenna tuner or adjusting a linear
amplifier.

As an alternative, you can assign a frequently-used menu or a function of a
double-function button such as NR LEV to the PF key for a quick activation.

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Hints and Tips

“Extension of PF function”

Though only two PF keys are available on the transceiver, it is possible to
increase the number of the PF keys by using a switch to switch a voltage
derived from the microphone connector.

If you have a microphone equipped with the PF keys such as MC-47 (although it
was discontinued and no longer available), you can assign the PF function to
the PF key and the UP and DOWN keys. Likewise, by adding an external circuit
as shown below, the PF function also can be assigned.

PF2 PF1 UP

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
PF4 PF3 DOWN
MIC CN
100 k22 k
100 k22 k
Figure 5-6 Example of Circuit

Caution:

• The figure shows the microphone connector viewed from the front panel, but it
is inverted (upside down).

• The circuit only shows the connection of DC signals. Be fully aware of loop
interference of radio frequency signals and other possible issues that may
arise.

• We will not accept any request for fixing problems arising from connecting
devices other than Kenwood’s genuine optional products regardless of the
content of this document.

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5.11 Expansion of Voice Guide Function (Optional VGS-1 Required)

The optional VGS-1 voice guide and storage unit can be installed on the
transceiver. The voice guide and audio recording function that are acclaimed by
sight-impaired operators become available. The following are the details of the
VGS-1 and new functions added for the current version.


Figure 5-7 VGS-1

• Voice Guide Function
On the TS-590S, in addition to the conventional audio announcements, the
readings of the multimeter (SWR meter, ALC meter and COMP meter) can be also
announced.

Also, by setting the auto announcement to be disabled in the menu mode, the
announcements can be made only when the VOICE key (that is to be assigned to
the PF key) is pressed.

• Voice Storage Function
A maximum of 4 channels can be used for storing voice for transmission. This is
a very convenient option for an operator who participates in a contest in SSB
mode. (The CW message memory function is available on the transceiver and does
not require VGS-1.)

Channel 4 of the voice recording channels for transmission can be assigned for
recording a received voice signal. Anytime upon a press of the [REC] key, you
can store the voice signal received over the past 30 seconds in flash memory
and replay the voice as required.

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Hints and Tips

“What are the projections on the rear panel for?” On the rear panel of the
TS-590S, projections are placed near some connectors.

Figure 5-8 Projections on the Rear Panel

We have provided these guides to meet the demands from sight-impaired operators
who wish to set up the transceiver without help from someone else. If two
identical connectors are placed side by side, you can not tell them apart just
by feeling them. The projections are provided so that the applications of the
connectors can be easily distinguished.

These projections will allow a sight-impaired person to understand the
positional relationship of the connectors and to connect cables easily by
feeling the rear panel with their fingers.

Also, a transceiver is often placed on a rack and a user is sometimes forced to
connect cables without seeing them. The projections will also help you in such
a situation.

This careful attention is also part of Kenwood’s efforts for “accessibility
improvement” based on “easy operation”.

Projections are provided near the following connectors: DRV, RX ANT, ANT1, and
ANT2.

5.12 Easy Updating of Firmware

The procedure of updating firmware is further simplified. Like the TS-480S that
already incorporates this function, there is no need for removing the cover.
You have only to connect a USB cable or an RS-232C cable and run the update
program on the PC. The availability of firmware updates is from time to time
announced on Kenwood’s website.


Figure 5-9 Sample Screen Shot of the Updater

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6 APPEARANCE DESIGN: “DESIGN CONCEPT” REVEALED BY DESIGNING ENGINEER

On the development of TS-590S, I exchanged lively discussions with my
colleagues and finally settled on the design concept of “deep and heavy”. This
means “a genuine HF transceiver that nobody can make light of” or “a design
that, when it is placed among other peripheral devices in a shack (which is
inevitable due to the nature of the product), does not stand out
distastefully”.

The work of designing a transceiver does not end with just creating an outer
shape, but includes a wide variety of tasks ranging from scrutinizing colors,
materials, character fonts, etc., to examining the size, thickness and balance
of characters displayed in the LCD.

A horizontal line penetrating the front panel describes the sharpness and the
DNA of Kenwood’s HF transceivers that has been handed down from generation to
generation.

When it comes to the main knob that a user touches most often, I have devised a
design that never makes a user tired from long hours of operation or slips out
of the hand while handling. Also, for the material I have employed
fluorine-containing rubber that does not attract dirt and dust.

As for the color of the body, I have selected matte-black finish to give it a
typical look of a transceiver and to prevent the reflection of light as much as
possible when a user operates from a portable station.

Much attention is also paid to the printing of the characters and graphics to
express the typical preciseness of Kenwood’s HF transceivers and to deliver
better visibility to enable intuitive operations and eye-friendly views.


Figure 6-1 A Sketch of the TS-590S

Figure 6-1 shows a sketch that is almost complete. We make a lot of such
sketches in the process of finalizing the outer design for the purpose of
discussions before creating a full-size mock-up sample.

The TS-590S is an HF transceiver launched by Kenwood after a long interval. We
felt desperately sorry each time a customer asked us, at the annual ham fairs,
when Kenwood’s new HF transceiver would be available.

I was more than happy that our hard work was rewarded when the TS-590S was
eventually launched and a customer told me “My patience finally paid off!” It
was my greatest joy as a designer.

Finally, as one of the developers, I hope the TS-590S will be used by as many
amateur radio operators as possible.

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7 STRUCTURAL FEATURES

Cooling

We have designed the chassis of the TS-590S to endure heavy-duty operation.

The PCBs are placed as follows: FINAL UNIT on the upper side of the chassis,
TX-RX UNIT and LO UNIT on the lower side, CONTROL UNIT beneath the LO UNIT, NB
UNIT and DISPLAY UNIT in front.

We have placed two cooling fans in the front of the chassis.

The cooling fans have two operation modes: LO and HI. By rotating two fan
motors at a lower revolution speed, we aimed to reduce the operating noise.

FINAL UNIT
TWIN FAN
TX-RX UNITLO UNIT NB UNIT
CONTROL UNIT
DISPLAY UNIT

Figure 7-1 Layout of Printed Circuits Boards of the TS-590S Series

We have optimized the chassis structure using computer-aided thermal analysis
to improve the heat dissipation performance. We have designed the chassis to
facilitate smooth air flow.


Figure 7-2 Results of Computer-aided Thermal Analysis

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We have also paid much attention to the area and shape of the air
inlets/outlets to lessen the operation noise of cooling fan motors.

To reduce the noise from the air inlets/outlets, the area and shape were
examined through repeated experiments and we have finally succeeded in
alleviating the cooling fan motors’ operating noise. The area of air
inlets/outlets of the TS-590S is about 1.5 times larger than that of TS-2000S
so that the suction and emission efficiency is improved.

The following figure portrays the aluminum die-cast chassis of the TS-590S.

Figure 7-3 shows the side of the FINAL UNIT, Figure 7-4 shows the side of the
TX-RX UNIT. Final FETs are positioned on the two raised areas located to the
left on the side of the FINAL UNIT. On the reverse side of the final FETs,
beneath the TX-RX UNIT, a heat sink (Figure 7-5) is placed to remove heat from
the final FETs and discharge it.


Figure 7-3 On the Side of FINAL UNIT

Figure 7-4 On the Side of TX-RX UNIT

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Figure 7-5 Heat Sink Section

We will provide the temperature data when a continuous transmission is made at
a 25°C or 77°F room temperature so that you can understand the TS-590S’s superb
cooling capability.


Figure 7-6 Temperature Data while Transmitting Continuously

As can be seen from the above graph, the output power does not drop (the
protection is not activated) while transmitting continuously for more than two
hours at a 25°C or 77°F room temperature with an output power of 100 W.

As explained above, TS-590S is designed for heavy-duty operation as were the
previous HF transceivers, but, as a general rule not limited to Kenwood
products, the higher the temperature, the shorter the life span of an
electronic device. Therefore, we recommend you use the transceiver with an
appropriate output power that suits the circumstances in order to prolong the
longevity of the transceiver.

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7.2 LCD

“We wanted to complete the display without uneven brightness!” That was our
goal of designing the display screen, or the “face” of the transceiver. On the
TS-590S, after repeated examinations and trials, we have finally reached our
goal of a display with perfectly even brightness.

The secret of this even brightness lies in the illumination structure of the
LCD.

The TS-590S’s illumination structure is a bottom direct-lit type backlight
structure in which LEDs are lit from the reverse side of the LCD. In the stage
of discussing the structure, we have also examined front-lit and edge-lit
designs that have been already proven in the previous transceivers, but they
didn’t suit the display size of the TS-590S, resulting in uneven illumination.
So, we focused on the the bottom direct-lit type backlight structure and
further studied the design.

We would like you to confirm the beauty of the display with your own eyes.

Also, as the first trial on a Kenwood HF transceiver, the color of the
backlight now can be switched between amber and green. At first, the color of
the backlight was amber only but, considering color visibility differs from one
amateur radio operator to another in the world, we have added green. You can
choose either amber or green backlighting, whichever pleases you most.

In addition to the backlight itself, we also carefully designed the brightness
(dimmer setting) of the backlight and the segment displays for better
visibility. You can choose among 7 steps of brightness (OFF and 1 though 6) of
the backlight in the menu mode.

The TS-590S has more dimmer setting steps than the TS-570S or TS-2000S,
allowing a user to adjust the backlight brightness to suit the installation
environment.

For the segment displays on the LCD, we have adopted a large-size, positive
LCD.

Focusing on the visibility, for 7-segment and 13-segment displays, we have
adopted the same large- size characters as in the TS-570S that were highly
evaluated. The type of LCD chosen is a semi- transmissive TN LCD (1/3 duty)
that has high contrast.

Good outdoor sunlight visibility is another reason why we have chosen a
semi-transmissive LCD. The TS-590S has a semi-transmissive LCD using a white
reflection plate. And this LCD type delivers comfortable visibility under
sunlight. Hence, the transceiver maintains good visibility characteristics
outdoors as well as indoors.


Figure 7-7 Amber and Green

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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7 STRUCTURAL FEATURES

7.3 Main Control Knob

We have designed the main control knob located in the center of the front
panel, focusing on easy handling and good appearance.

For the encoder, a 250-pulse magnetic encoder is adopted, which enables the
pulses are multiplied by 4 using software to produce 1,000 pulses per
revolution so that a user can tune to the desired frequency smoothly.

Each of the aluminum parts is machined with CNC (computerized numeric control)
and treated with spin finish. We also paid careful attention to the color of
the main control knob; we have colored the knob with a color alumite treatment.

We made samples repeatedly until the desired color was finalized. The alumite
color is adjusted to match the rubber color of the knob ring and the paint
color of the front panel in order to express the integration and massiveness of
the entire panel.

Not only for the main control knob, easy handling was our priority when
designing the sizes and locations of other controls (knobs and keys). We
carefully studied the sizes and layout of the knobs so that a finger will not
hit the adjacent knob when a user turns a knob.

Though the TS-590S has a relatively compact front panel as an HF transceiver,
the controls are positioned for comfortable operation.

Main control knob

Figure 7-8 Main Control Knob

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE
8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

Windows Related Software

This chapter describes the Windows related software to be used to control the
TS-590S from a PC. Following are the Windows related software products that
can be used with the TS-590S.

Table 8-1 Windows Related Software for TS-590S

Name: Description
ARCP-590: This software enables control of the TS-590S from a PC.
ARHP-590: This host program is used on the host station PC when the TS-590S is remotely controlled over
a network. The software is used in combination with ARCP-590.
ARVP-10:
This VoIP software is to transfer the TX and RX audio signals when remotely controlling the
TS-590S over a network.
Note: The software is composed of ARVP-10H and ARVP-10R.
ARUA-10:
This software enables use of the microphone and speaker of a PC in place of
those on the TS-590S. It enables the audio signal from the PC’s microphone to
be transfered via USB audio and transmitted from the TS-590S. Also, the audio
output of the TS-590S can be emitted from the PC’s speaker via USB audio.

Note:
• If you are using a home-made audio cable connected to the ACC2 connector, this
software is not required.

• This software is not required if this is used over a network.

Virtual COM Port Driver:
Being installed on the PC, this supports use of ARCP-590 and ARHP-590 after the
TS-590S is connected to a PC with a USB cable.

Note: If the TS-590S is connected to the PC with a serial cable, this software
is not required.

8.2 System Configurations

We will provide some typical system configurations using the TS-590S and
Windows software.

8.2.1 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the COM Connector

The microphone connected to the TS-590S and the transceiver’s built-in speaker
are used.

PC: Type of Connection
TS-590S
Software Hardware Hardware
Control signal ARCP-590 -RS-232C cable * Connected to the COM connector
Audio signal --No connection
The microphone connected to the
TS-590S and the transceiver’s built-in
speaker

52

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.2.2 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the USB Connector

The microphone connected to the TS-590S and the transceiver’s built-in speaker
are used.

PC Type of
Connection
TS-590S
Software Hardware Hardware
Control signal
Virtual COM port
driver and
ARCP-590
-USB cable * Connected to the USB connector
Audio signal --No connection
The microphone connected to the
TS-590S and the transceiver’s built-in
speaker


8.2.3 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the COM and ACC2
connectors (microphone and speaker connected to the PC to
be used)
The microphone and speaker connected to a PC are used. The ACC2 connector is used for input/
output of the TS-590S’s audio signal.

PC Type of
Connection
TS-590S
Software Hardware Hardware
Control signal ARCP-590 -RS-232C cable * Connected to the COM connector
Audio signal -
The microphone
and speaker
connected to the
PC
Home-made
audio cable * Connected to the ACC2 connector

Caution: To use the ACC2 connector for input/output of the audio signal,
ARUA-10 is not required.

8.2.4 Controlling TS-590S from a PC using the USB connector

(microphone and speaker connected to the PC to be used)
The microphone and speaker connected to the PC are used. The USB connector is used for input/
output of the TS-590S’s audio signal.

PC: Type of Connection
TS-590S
Software Hardware Hardware
Control signal
Virtual COM port
driver and
ARCP-590
-
USB cable * Connected to the USB connector
Audio signal
Windows
standard driver
and ARUA-10
The microphone
and speaker
connected to a
PC

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.2.5 Controlling TS-590S from a PC on a Remote Site

Remote Station (PC that remotely
controls the transceiver) Type of
Connection
Host station (PC that is located
near the TS-590S)
Software Hardware Software Hardware
Control signal ARCP-590 -ARHP-590
* Connected to
the COM or USB
connector
Audio signal
ARVP-10R or
generic VoIP
software
The microphone
and speaker
connected to a
PC
Network
ARVP-10H or
generic VoIP
software
* Connected to
the ACC2 or USB
connector

Caution: When the USB connector is used for input/output of the audio signal on
the host station, ARUA-10 is not required neither.

8.3 New ARCP-590 (Amateur Radio Control Program for
TS-590S) Freeware

ARCP-590 (Amateur Radio Control Program for TS-590S) is software enabling
control of the TS-590S from a PC.


Figure 8-1 Main Window of ARCP-590

ARCP-590 is available free and can be downloaded from Kenwood’s website.
URLs from which ARCP-590 can be downloaded:

http://www.kenwood.com/i/products/info/amateur/software_download.html

As with ARCP-480 for the TS-480S, the new ARCP-590 program is designed to
control virtually all of the functions on the TS-590S transceiver.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE


8.3.1 Basic Specifications Inherited from ARCP-480

The basic specifications of the ARCP-590 are inherited from ARCP-480 for the
TS-480S. In addition, ARCP-590 conforms to the new functions of the TS-590S.

8.3.2 User Interfaces

ARCP-590 supports Japanese and English user interface languages. A user can use
ARCP-590 in the language the user is the most familiar with.

The ARCP-590 comes with a function to automatically connect to the TS-590S when the software is
started. If you habitually control the TS-590S from a PC, the function saves the effort to establish a
connection each time. To enable this function, from the Tool pulldown menu,
select “Setup” and in the Setup dialog box, click on the Connect automatically
at startup checkbox to activate.

In addition to the tuning control method used in ARCP-480 for TS-480S, ARCP-590
has new methods to change frequency as follows:

1. Frequency change with the main knob

2. Frequency change with “Tune up” and “Tune down” buttons

3. Frequency change with “MULTI/CH up” and “MULTI/Ch down” buttons

4. Frequency change with the direct input mode

5. Frequency change with the mouse wheel

6. Frequency change by clicking on the frequency display section

In method 1 and 2, you can now select the tuning step from the Tuning step
dropdown list.

Caution: In the event you are using KSN over a network or you have selected a
setting other than “Preset” from the Tuning Step dropdown list, the response
may be slower. In such a case, select “Preset”. This is because the way to
control the TS-590S differs in Preset and in other settings.

In method 5, by turning the mouse wheel, you can change the step selected from
the MULTI/CH Step dropdown list. By turning the mouse wheel while pressing down
the [Ctrl] key, you can change the step selected form the Tuning Step dropdown
list (this function is available in ARCP-590 Ver. 1.01 or later).

In ARCP-590, a status bar is added in the bottom part of the main window. You
can check frequently- used items in a single glance, such as modulation line,
transmit output power, microphone gain, keying speed, connection destination,
time in UTC and local time.


Figure 8-2 Status Bar

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE


The ARCP-590 has newly adopted a listing by category in the menu function. The
new listing by category as well as the conventional general listing allows
quick access to the desired function.


Figure 8-3 Menu Function

The ARCP-590 enables a user to set the delay time for switching from transmit
to receive in order to address the delay that occurs when using KNS over a
network. Formerly, the last part of the transmitted voice was sometimes cut off
when switching from transmit to receive due to the difference of delay time of
control commands and of audio signals. In order to solve this problem, the
timing to actually switch back to receive can be delayed for the time period
specified in ARCP-590 after the user operates the switchover.

From the Tool pulldown menu, select “c”. In the Setup TX Control dialog box of
transmit control you can select delay time from the Switching the delay time
from transmit to receive while the transceiver is connected to the network
dropdown list for switching back from transmit to receive when controlling over
a network connection.

8.3.3 KNS (Kenwood Network Command System)

As with ARCP-480 for the TS-480S, the ARCP-590 also enables control of the
transceiver using KNS over LAN or the Internet. Install ARHP-590 program
(explained later) on the host station PC to construct the system.


Figure 8-4 Conceptual Image of a KNS Configuration

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE


In ARCP-590, the number of connection destinations that can be registered has
been expanded from a maximum of 10 to 100.

The ARCP-480 and ARHP-10 for the TS-480S are supplied with the VoIP function to
send and receive voice over the network connection, but the VoIP engine is not
compatible with newer Windows OS’s. That’s the reason the VoIP function is
excluded from the new ARCP-590 program.

In order to use VoIP capability, construct a system using ARVP-10H and ARVP-10R
(explained later) or generic VoIP software.

KNS Welcome Message function is added so that the KNS host administrator can
leave a simple message to a KNS client user; or a KNS client user to the
another KNS client user.

The KNS welcome message can be edited or deleted either from ARCP-590 or
ARHP-590.

In ARCP-590, select the “Edit KNS Welcome Message” from the Tool pulldown menu
and you can edit or delete the welcome message in the Edit KNS Welcome Message
dialog box.

In ARHP-590, select the “Edit KNS Welcome Message” from the Tool pulldown menu
and you can edit or delete the welcome message in the Edit KNS Welcome Message
dialog box.


Figure 8-5 KNS Welcome Message

Refer also to “TS-590S KENWOOD NETWORK COMMAND SYSTEM Setting Manual” on the
Kenwood’s website.

Caution:
You must comply with all radio and domestic laws, regulations and rules of the
country or region where you are connecting with the KNS System via the
Internet.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.3.4 Visual Scan

ARCP-590 is capable of visually showing the location of the current RX
frequency on the display and of shifting the current RX frequency to the center
of the scan span. The scan center frequency and the scan span can be stored for
each amateur radio band. It is ideal for checking the condition of respective
bands for specified frequency ranges.


Figure 8-6 Visual Scan

Note: During the scan, the receive audio of the transceiver is muted.

8.3.5 Audio Equalizer
In ARCP-590, the setting of the audio filter can be configured with a graphic equalizer-type interface.
ARCP-590 has 18 bands from 0 Hz through 5,100 kHz.


Figure 8-7 Audio Equalizer

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.4 ARHP-590 (Amateur Radio Host Program) Freeware

ARHP-590 is the host application to control the TS-590S with Kenwood Network
Command System (KNS).


Figure 8-8 Main Window of ARHP-590

ARHP-590 is available free and can be downloaded from Kenwood’s website.
URLs from which ARHP-590 can be downloaded:

http://www.kenwood.com/i/products/info/amateur/software_download.html

Refer also to “TS-590S KENWOOD NETWORK COMMAND SYSTEM Setting Manual” on the
Kenwood’s website.


8.4.1 Basic Specifications Inherited from ARHP-10

The basic specifications of the ARHP-590 are inherited from ARHP-10 for the
TS-480E. In addition, ARCP-590 is compatible with the new functions of the
TS-590S.


8.4.2 User Interfaces
ARHP-590 supports Japanese and English user interface languages. A user can use
ARHP-590 in the language the user is the most familiar with.

In ARHP-590, a function to automatically run the program when Windows starts is
added. Using this function, upon restart of the PC, ARHP-590 can be activated
and a connection is made automatically. To enable this function, select
“Setup” from the Tool pulldown menu and in the Setup dialog box, click on the
Activating automatically when Windows starts checkbox.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

ARHP-590 allows a user to check the operating status of ARHP-590 and TS-590S
even after minimized. You can check the status of the power of the TS-590S
(Power ON or Power OFF) and your connection and transmission statuses.


Figure 8-9 Checking the Operating Status


8.4.3 KNS (Kenwood Network Command System)

For details of Kenwood Network Command System, refer to 8.3.3. KNS (Kenwood
Network Command System).


8.4.4 Disabling AF Gain Control from ARCP-590

ARHP-590 has a capability to disable the AF gain control from the ARCP-590.
While AF gain is controlled from ARCP-590, the audio volume of the TS-590S may
be adjusted in an unexpected way. Therefore, we have added a function to
disable this control.

To enable this function, from the Tool pulldown menu, select “Setup” and click
on the Prohibits control of AF gain from ARCP-590 checkbox.

8.5 New ARUA-10 (USB Audio Controller) Freeware

We have released ARUA-10, the USB audio control software to allow the PC’s
microphone and speaker to be used in place those of the TS-590S. ARUA-10 is
available free and can be downloaded from Kenwood’s website. URLs from which
ARUA-10 can be downloaded:


http://www.kenwood.com/i/products/info/amateur/software_download.html


Refer also to “TS-590S USB Audio Setting Manual” on the Kenwood’s website.


Caution:


For USB audio, time delay is unavoidable due to its operating principle.
Therefore, USB audio cannot be used for a latency- critical application (e.g.
operations in a contest or pileup where a quick response is essential).


During the operation with KNS over a network connection, ARUA-10 is not
required.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.5.1 Basic Functions

If ARUA-10 and ARCP-590 are used in combination, you have only to connect the
TS-590S and a PC with a single USB cable to use the microphone and speaker
connected to the PC in place of those on the transceiver. To use ARCP-590 over
a USB cable connection, the virtual COM port driver needs to be installed.

If you use only ARUA-10 over a USB cable connection, the virtual port driver
doesn’t need to be installed. If you use the built-in USB sound function of the
TS-590S only, the function runs on the Window’s standard driver.

8.5.2 Operation

ARUA-10 bridges the TS-590S’s built-in USB sound function (USB audio device) and the sound
device that controls the microphone and speaker on the PC.

A voice signal from the microphone connected to the PC is input into the
modulation input of the TS-590S’s USB audio device. The audio output of the
TS-590S’s USB audio device is emitted from the PC’s speaker.


Figure 8-10 Flow of the Audio Signal


8.5.3 Setup
Configure the necessary settings to use ARUA-10.

Right click the “ARUA-10” icon in the Windows task tray and select “Device Setup” in the menu and
the Setup dialog box will appear. In the Device tab, you can set up the device to input/output the
audio signal.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE


Figure 8-11 Device Tab

In the “Reception Output” of the Transceiver frame, “Microphone (USB Audio
CODEC)” must be selected. In the “Modulation Input” of the Transceiver frame,
“Speaker (USB Audio CODEC)” must be selected.

In the “Microphone” of the PC frame, specify the microphone of the sound
device.

In the “Speakers” of the PC frame, specify the speaker of the sound device.

You can check the name of the sound device in the entry under “Sound video and
game controllers” category in Windows Device Manager.

 

8.5.4 Starting and Stopping ARUA-10

To start ARUA-10, after above settings completes, right click the “ARUA-10” icon in the Windows task
tray and select “Start” in the menu.

To stop ARUA-10, right click the “ARUA-10” icon in the Windows task tray and
select “Stop” in the menu.

8.5.5 Adjusting Volume

To adjust volume of ARUA-10, right click the “ARUA-10” icon in the Windows task tray and select
“Volume” in the menu and from the volume screen adjust volume.

For details, refer to “TS-590S USB Audio Setting Manual” on the Kenwood’s
website.

8.5.6 Automatic Execution when Windows Starts

ARUA-10 is capable of starting automatically at the start of Windows. With this
capability enabled, ARUA-10 starts and connection is made automatically upon
restart of a PC.

To enable this capability, right click the “ARUA-10” icon in the Windows task tray and select “Other
settings” in the menu, and the Setup dialog will appear. In the Other tab, click on the Run
automatically at Windows startup checkbox.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE


8.6 New ARVP-10H (Amateur Radio VoIP Program) Freeware

We have released the ARVP-10H program that provides the VoIP function at the
host station (to which TS-590S is connected) and the ARVP-10R program that
provides the VoIP function at the remote station (which controls the
transceiver remotely).

Figure 8-12 Main Window of ARVP-10H


ARVP-10H and ARVP-10R are available free and can be downloaded from Kenwood’s
website. URLs from which ARVP-10H and ARVP-10R can be downloaded:

http://www.kenwood.com/i/products/info/amateur/software_download.html

Refer also to “TS-590S KENWOOD NETWORK COMMAND SYSTEM Setting Manual” on the
Kenwood’s website.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.6.1 Basic Functions

ARVP-10H and ARVP-10R enable a voice signal to be sent and received over LAN or
the Internet.


8.6.2 Setup of ARVP-10H (Host Station)

Configure the necessary settings to use ARVP-10H.

Select “User Settings” from the File pulldown menu and click the “Add...”
button in the User Settings dialog box and the Setup User dialog box will
appear, In Setup User dialog box, you can set the user name and password.


Figure 8-14 Setup User Dialog Box (ARVP-10H)

To disable the user temporarily, click on the User is disabled checkbox. To
deny a connection request from all users temporarily, click on the Reject
connection request checkbox in the main window.

8.6.3 Making ARVP-10H (host station) Online or Offline

To place ARVP-10H online, after above setting is complete, click the “Online”
button in the main window.

To take ARVP-10H offline, click the “Offline” button in the main window.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE


8.6.4 Setup of ARVP-10R (remote station)

Configure the necessary settings to use ARVP-10R.

Select “ARVP-S10R Settings” from the File pulldown menu and click the “Add...”
button in the ARVP-10R Settings dialog box and the Detailed Settings dialog box
will appear. In Detailed Settings dialog box, you can set the connection name,
IP address, the port number, user name and password.


Figure 8-15 Detailed Settings Dialog Box (ARVP-10R)


8.6.5 Connecting and Disconnecting ARVP-10R (Remote Station)

To connect ARVP-10R to ARVP-10H, after above setting is complete, click the
“Connect” button in the main window.

To disconnect ARVP-10R and ARVP-10H, click the “Disconnect” button in the main
window.


8.6.6 Adjusting Volume

ARVP-10H and ARVP-10R have no function to adjust volume. Instead, use the
volume mixer or volume control in Windows to adjust volume.

TS-590S

CONTENTS

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8 EXPANSIVE APPLICATION SOFTWARE

8.7 New Virtual COM Port Driver

To connect the TS-590S and a PC via a USB cable to control TS-590S, the virtual
COM port driver needs to be installed on the PC.

URLs from which virtual COM port driver can be downloaded:

http://www.kenwood.com/i/products/info/amateur/software_download.html

If you connect the TS-590S and a PC using an RS-232C cable, the virtual COM port driver does not
need to be installed.

Also, if you connect the TS-590S and a PC via a USB cable and you use only
ARUA-10, the virtual COM port driver does not need to be installed either. If
you use only the built-in USB sound function of the TS-590S, the function
behaves using the Window’s standard driver.

To view the COM port number to which the virtual COM port driver has assigned
the USB port of the TS-590S, open Windows Device Manager and check “Port (COM
and LPT)”. Locate the entry named “Silicon Labs CP210x USB to UART Bridge
(COMxx)” and “xx” in the “COMxx” represents the COM port number assigned by the
current virtual COM port driver.

In the example of Figure 8-16, you can see the indication of “Silicon Labs
CP210x USB to UART Bridge (COM4)”. In this case, “COM4” is the COM port number
assigned by the current virtual COM port driver.


Figure 8-16 Device Manager

While the TS-590S and a PC are connected via a USB cable, the COM port number
is changed if the USB port is switched to another USB port. To view the current
COM port number, follow the above procedure again.

CONTENTS

TS-590S

.
9 OPTIONAL ACCESSORY

PS-60 is a regulated DC power supply designed for amateur transceivers.

The power supply adopts a switching module that accepts the input AC Voltage in
the range from 90 V to 264 V. Though the power supply unit is compact in size
(W 173.5 mm x H 95.5 mm x D 204.3 mm or W 6.83 inch x H 3.76 inch x D 8.04
inch) and lightweight (2.6 kg, or 5.73 lb), it has a capability to stably
supply the power source enough to the transceivers including the TS-590S for
100-W class output power.

PS-60 has a higher load efficiency (85% typical with rated load current at 100
V) than the conventional transformer-type power supply units and conforms to
your local energy regulations, enabling ecological and economical operation.

PS-60 received safety certificates in many countries in the world and
incorporates the following protection features. Furthermore, the power supply
has gone through safety and durability tests conducted according to Kenwood’s
criteria to ensure your safe operation.

<Overcurrent Protection Feature>

If the load current exceeds 27 A, the output voltage droops and the output
becomes intermittent to protect the main body. <Overvoltage Protection

Feature>

If the output voltage exceeds 18 V due to any failure, the supply of the power
source stops so as to protect the connected device.
<Temperature Protection Feature>

The internal temperature is always monitored and if an aberrant value is
detected, the supply of the power source stops so as to protect the main body.

The unit is equipped with a quiet cooling fan that starts running once the
internal circuit detects the temperature exceeding a certain level.

The power supply unit has an external appearance design that matches the
TS-590S and the front panel can be positioned on the same panel height of the
TS-590S using the stand on the front bottom. (Since the length of the body
differs, the angle of inclination is slightly different.)


Figure 9-1 PS-60

TS-590S

CONTENTS

67

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9 OPTIONAL ACCESSORY

9.2 Rectifier Circuit


Adopts a PFC Circuit that does not Produce Harmonics in an AC Rectifier Circuit
A switching power supply typically produces large harmonics in the rectifier circuit by its switching
operation which compromises the phase factor and may cause noise and other disturbances to
external devices due to the harmonics that are reflected back to the AC input side.

PS-60 incorporates a PFC-rectifier circuit that produces a rectified waveform
close to a sine wave and prevents a compromise of phase factor and disturbances
caused by harmonics.


Miniaturized Size by Employing an Interleaved Switching Scheme By turning On
and Off the FET switches on the master and slave sides alternately, the burden
on each element is lessened and reliability is improved.

9.3 Switching Circuit, Constant-voltage Circuit and Protection Circuit

In the switching circuit, a full-wave current resonance type PFM control
circuit is adopted to alternately turn On and Off two FETs in a 50% duty cycle.
By defining a certain period of time after both FETs are turned Off, a soft
switching operation, in which no current is made to flow at the point of
switchover, is made possible to reduce noise.

Figure 9-2 Comparing Rectification Waveforms

A high switching frequency (about 500 kHz) is chosen to enable miniaturization
of the transformer for highly-efficient DC conversion. The DC output voltage
after the conversion is monitored by the detection circuit to be compared with
the reference voltage in the PFM control circuit in order to control the
switching frequency for stabilizing the output voltage. If an overvoltage is
detected, the switching of power source stops so as to suspend the DC output.

Also, output current is monitored by the detection circuit and if an
overcurrent is detected, the switching frequency is shifted to droop the output
voltage and the operation is transited to produce intermittent output.


Figure 9-3 Circuit Diagram

CONTENTS

TS-590S

 


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