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Cat 20-527

PRO-97 1,000 Channel Triple
Trunking Hand Held Scanner


Please read this user’s guide before installing,
setting up and using your new product
www.radioshack.com
.
Contents


Thank you for purchasing your Pro-97 1,000 channel tripple
trunking hand held scanner from RadioShack. Your hand held
scanner is one of a new generation of scanners designed
to track Motorola® Type I and II (such as Smartnet® and
Privacy Plus®) and hybrid analog trunking systems, GE-
Ericsson (EDACS®) type systems, and EF Johnson (LTR) type
systems which are extensively used in many communication
systems.

2user’s guide • quick start guide • preprogrammed frequency addendum
Scanner Antenna
Belt clip
Non-
rechargeable
battery holder
Rechargeable
battery holder
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The Basics


contents


your scanner’s controls

7

power sources 12
using batteries 12
charging rechargeable batteries 14
using AC power 15
using vehicle battery power 16
connecting an earphone/headphones 16
listening safely 17
traffic safety 17
connecting an extension speaker 17
connecting the supplied antenna 18
connecting an optional external antenna 18
using the belt clip 19
transferring data to or from another scanner or PC 19

quick start 20
understanding your scanner’s modes 20
AM mode 20
FM mode 21
CTCSS (CT) mode 21
DCS (DC) mode 21
Motorola mode 22
EDACS mode 24
LTR mode 25
open and closed modes 26

setting up your scanner 28
turning on the scanner and setting squelch 28
storing known frequencies into channels 29

CTCSS and DCS 31

storing trunking frequencies into channels 33

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storing text tags 34
assigning a text tag to a channel 34
assigning a text tag to a group ID 35
assigning a tex tage to a bank 35
text input chart 36
finding and storing active frequencies 37
searching a preprogrammed frequency range 37
band charts 38
search bank: SR0 marine band 38
search bank: SR1 CB band 40
search bank: SR2 FRS/GMRS/MURS band 40
search bank: SR3 police/fi re band 41
search bank: SR4 aircraft 42
search bank: SR5 amateur band 43
search bank: SR6 programmable limit search 43
searching active frequencies in a range 43
manually tuning a frequency 45
listening to the weather band 45
listening to a weather channel 46
SAME standby mode 46
WX Alert and beep tone confi rmation 47
Skywarn 48
using frequency copy 48
copying a frequency into a specifi ed channel 48
copying a frequency into an empty channel
within a bank 49
copying a frequency into the priority channel 50
Signal Stalker II 50
using Signal Stalker II 51
using Signal Stalker II with lockout 51
scanning channels 52
turning channel-starage banks off and on 52
monitoring a single channel/power save circuit 53


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using CTCSS and DCS 53

deleting frequencies from channels 54

deleting all frequencies in a channel bank 54

using dealy 55

locking out channels or frequencies 55
locking out channels 55
reviewing locked-out channels 56
locking out frequencies 56
reviewing locked-out frequencies 56
clearing a locked-out frequency 57
clearing all locked-out frequencies in a search bank 57

priority 57
changing the receive mode 59
using the attenuator 60
turning the key tone on and off 61
using the display/key backlight 61
using the keylock 63
changing the display contrast 63
cloning the programmed data 64

trunking 65
how trunking works 65
setting squelch for trunking mode 67
programming trunking frequencies 67
programming Motorola trunking systems (UHF-Lo) 69
programming Motorola trunking systems (800 MHz) 71
programming fl eet maps 71
talk group IDs 73
storing talk group IDs 73
talk group ID hold 76
turning an ID sub-bank on or off 76
locking out talk group IDs 77
delay function in ID indication mode 77
reviewing locked-out talk group IDs 78

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clearing talk group IDs 78
clearing all talk group IDs in a single bank 78
changing the open/closed mode 79
care 80
service and repair 80
birdie frquencies 80
specifi cations 81
initializing your scanner 84
The FCC wants you to know 85
scanning legally 85
glossary 86
FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 87
warranty 88

Hypersearch, Hyperscan, and Adaptaplug are trademarks used by RadioShack Corporation.
Motorola, Smartnet, ASTRO and Privacy Plus are registered trademarks of Motorla Inc.
EDACS is a registered trademark of MA-COM Inc.

LTR is a registered trademark of EF Johnson.


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your scanner’s controls


SCAN/ — scans through the
programmed channels, or
activates the Signal Stalker II
function.
FUNC (function) — lets you
use various functions
by pressing this key in
combination with other keys.
MAN — stops scanning and
lets you directly enter a
channel number.
TRUNK — stores the trunking
ID code or holds the trunking
ID while scanning.
WX/ — scans through
the seven preprogrammed
weather channels, or jumps
to a Skywarn channel you
programmed (997-999).
PRI (Priority) — sets and turns
the priority function on or off.
TEXT — lets you input text.
PSE — stops search.
MODE — changes the receive
mode (AM, FM, CT, DC, MO,
ED, LT).
LIGht/ — turns on/off the
backlight, or when used
with FUNC locks/unlocks the
keypad to prevent accidental
entries.
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ATT (Attenuate) — turns
attenuation on to reduce
the scanner’s sensitivity
and block extremely strong
signals, or turns it off to
return the sensitivity to
normal.
TUNE — lets you input a
frequency and allows you to
fine tune a frequency along
with e or d. (up and down arrows)
e or d — selects the scan or
search direction. E is up arrow. D is down arrow.
SRCH — lets you search the
seven search banks.
L/OUT (Lock Out) — lets you
lock out a selected channel,
skip a specified frequency
during search, or lock out a
selected ID code.
ENT — completes the entry of
frequencies and text.
PGM (Program) — programs
frequencies into channels.
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0 — enters a zero, or inputs
characters ., -, #, _, @, +, *,
&, /, ,, $, %, !, ^, (, ), ?, ~, ‘,
or ..
1 — enters a 1, or inputs
characters 0 through 9 in text
mode.
2/ABC — enters a 2, or inputs
characters A, B, or C.
3/DEF — enters a 3, or inputs
characters D, E, or F.
4/GHI — enters a 4, or inputs
characters G, H, or I.
5/JKL — enters a 5, or inputs
characters J, K, or L.
6/MNO — enters a 6, or inputs
characters M, N, or O.
7/PQRS — enters a 7, or inputs
characters P, Q, R, or S.
8/TUV — enters an 8, or inputs
characters T, U, or V.
9/WXYZ — enters a 9, or inputs
characters W, X, Y, or Z.
CL (Clear) — clears an
incorrect entry.
./DELAY — enters a decimal
point (necessary when
programming frequencies),
space, or programs delay
time for the selected
channel/search bank, or
enters a hyphen (in trunking
ID setting).
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The Basics


PWR DC 9V — connect a power
source here. Located on left side of radio.
PC/IF — connect an optional
PC interface cable here to
use the scanner with your
computer. Located on right side of radio.
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ANT — connect the supplied
antenna or an external
antenna here. Located on top left of radio.
Headphones — connect an earphone
or headphone here. Located on top middle of radio.
OFF VOL/SQ — turn the scanner
on or off and adjust the
squelch. Located on top right of radio.
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power sources

You can power your scanner from any of these sources:

• internal non-rechargeable batteries or rechargeable
batteries (not supplied – see “Using Batteries”).
• standard AC power (with an optional AC adapter – see
“Using AC Power”).
• vehicle power (with an optional DC adapter – see “Using
Vehicle Battery Power”).
NotesNotes
Connecting an AC or DC adapter to the scanner
disconnects internal batteries when you use the
supplied non-rechargeable battery holder, but it does not
disconnect internal batteries when you use the supplied
rechargeable battery holder.

If you install the rechargeable battery holder, you can
operate the scanner and recharge the rechargeable
batteries at the same time. See “Using Batteries” and
“Charging Rechargeable Batteries”.

If the scanner stops working properly after connecting it
to power, try resetting it. See “Initializing the Scanner”.

You must charge rechargeable batteries before you
use them the first time. See “Charging Rechargeable
Batteries”.

using batteries

You can power the scanner with four AA batteries (not
supplied). For the longest operation and best performance,
we recommend alkaline batteries, available at your local
RadioShack store.

You can use either the supplied non-rechargeable battery
holder (black), or the supplied rechargeable battery holder
(yellow). If you use the rechargeable battery holder, we


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The Basics


recommend RadioShack nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH)
batteries.

You must charge rechargeable batteries before you use them
the first time. See “Charging Rechargeable Batteries”.

Never install non-rechargeable batteries in the
rechargeable yellow battery holder. Non-Rechargeable
batteries can get hot or explode if you try to recharge
Warning!Warning!
them.


NotesNotes
The battery holder fits only one way. Do not force it.

Use only fresh batteries of the required size and
recommended type.


Always remove old or weak batteries. Batteries can leak
chemicals that destroy electronic circuits.

Do not mix old and new batteries, different types of
batteries (alkaline or rechargeable), or rechargeable
batteries of different capacities.

If you do not plan to use the scanner with batteries for a
month or longer, remove the batteries. Batteries can leak
chemicals that can destroy electronic parts.

Follow these steps to install the batteries.

1. Press in on the battery compartment cover on the back of
the scanner and slide the cover down to remove it.
2. Pull the battery holder out of the battery compartment.
3. If you are using non-rechargeable batteries, place them
into the black holder, as indicated by the polarity symbols
(+ and -) marked on the holder.
If you are using rechargeable batteries, place them into the
yellow holder as indicated by the polarity symbols (+ and -)
marked on the holder.

4. Place the battery holder into the battery compartment.
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5. Replace the cover.
When battery power is low, Low battery! appears and
the scanner beeps continuously. When battery power
is depleted, the scanner turns itself off. Replace all four
non-rechargeable batteries, or recharge the rechargeable
batteries. See “Charging Rechargeable Batteries”.

NotesNotes
Always dispose of old batteries promptly and properly.
Do not bury or burn them.

If you do not plan to use the scanner with batteries for a
month or longer, remove the batteries. Batteries can leak
chemicals that can destroy electronic parts.

charging rechargeable batteries

Your scanner has a built-in charging circuit that lets you
charge nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) or nickel cadmium (Ni-
CD) rechargeable batteries (not supplied) while they are in
the scanner. To charge rechargeable batteries, connect an
appropriate AC or DC adapter to the PWR DC 9V jack. For
best results we recommend RadioShack rechargeable nickel-
metal hydride (Ni-MH) 1600 mAh batteries.

NotesNotes
The EPA certified RBRC© Battery Recycling Seal on the
nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) battery indicates RadioShack
is voluntarily participating in an industry program to
collect and recycle these batteries at the end of their
useful life, when taken out of service in the United States
or Canada. The RBRC program provides a convenient
alternative to placing used Ni-Cd batteries into the trash
or the municipal waste stream, which may be illegal in
your area. Please call 1-800-THE-SHACK (1-800-843-7422)
for information on Ni-Cd battery recycling and disposal
bans/restrictions in your area. RadioShack’s involvement
in this program is part of the company’s commitment to
preserving our environment and conserving our natural
resources.


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It takes about 16 hours to recharge fully discharged 1600
mAh Ni-MH rechargeable batteries. You can operate the
scanner while recharging the rechargeable batteries, but
charging takes longer.

The scanner can also charge Ni-Cd batteries. 600 mAh
batteries require 6 hours and 850 mAh batteries require 8
hours to charge.
NotesNotes
When you charge rechargeable batteries, do not

overcharge them. Overcharging shortens battery life.

Rechargeable batteries last longer and deliver more
power if you let them fully discharge once a month. To
do this, use the scanner until Low battery! appears. Then
fully charge the rechargeable batteries.

using AC power

You can power the scanner using a 9V, 300 mA AC adapter
and a size C Adaptaplug (neither supplied). Both are available
at your local RadioShack store.

1. Connect the Adaptaplug to the adapter’s cord with the tip
set to positive.
ou must use a Class 2 power source that supplies 9V
DC and delivers at least 300 mA. Its center tip must be
set to positive and its plug must fit the scanner’s PWR
DC 9V jack. Using an adapter that does not meet these
specifications could damage the scanner or the adapter.

2. Plug the adapter’s barrel plug into the scanner’s PWR DC
9V jack.
3. Plug the adapter’s two-prong plug into an AC outlet.
NotesNotes
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The Basics


using vehicle battery power

You can power the scanner from a vehicle’s 12V power
source (such as cigarette-lighter socket) using a 9V, 300
mA DC adapter and a size C Adaptaplug™ adapter (neither
supplied). Both are available at your local RadioShack store.

You must use a power source that supplies 9V DC and
delivers at least 300 mA. Its center tip must be set to
positive and its plug must fit the scanner’s PWR DC
NotesNotes
9V jack. Using an adapter that does not meet these
specifications could damage the scanner or the adapter.

1. Connect the Adaptaplug to the adapter’s cord with the tip
set to positive.
2. Plug the adapter’s barrel plug into the scanner’s PWR DC
9V jack.
3. Plug the adapter’s cigarette-lighter plug into your 12V
power source.
NotesNotes
If the scanner does not operate properly when you
connect a DC adapter, unplug the DC adapter from the
power source and clean the socket, or check the adapter’s
internal fuse.

connecting an earphone/headphones

For private listening, you can plug an 1/8-inch (3.5 mm)
mini-plug earphone or headphones (not supplied), available
at your local RadioShack store, in the


jack on top of your
scanner. This automatically disconnects the internal speaker.
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The Basics


listening safely

To protect your hearing, follow these guidelines when you
use an earphone or headphones.

• Set the volume to zero before putting on headphones.
With the headphones on, adjust the volume to a
comfortable level.
• Avoid increasing the volume once you set it. Over time,
your sensitivity to a volume level decreases, so volume
levels that do not cause discomfort might damage your
hearing.
• Avoid or limit listening at high volume levels. Prolonged
exposure to high volume levels can cause permanent
hearing loss.
traffi c safety

Do not wear an earphone or headphones while you drive a
vehicle or ride a bicycle. This can create a traffi c hazard and
can be illegal in some areas. Even though some earphones
and headphones let you hear some outside sounds when you
listen at normal levels, they still can present a traffi c hazard.

connecting an extension speaker

In a noisy area, an amplified speaker (not supplied), available
at your local RadioShack store, might provide more
comfortable listening. Plug the speaker cable’s 1/8-inch (3.5
mm) mini-plug into your scanner’s


jack.

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The Basics


connecting the supplied
antenna

To attach the supplied flexible antenna
to the antenna jack on the top of your
scanner, align the slots around the
antenna’s connector with the tabs on the
antenna jack. Press the antenna down
over the jack and turn the antenna’s
base clockwise until it locks into place.

connecting an optional external
antenna

The antenna connector on your scanner
makes it easy to use the scanner with a
variety of antennas, such as an external
mobile antenna or outdoor base station
antenna. Your local RadioShack store sells a variety of
antennas.

Always use 50-ohm coaxial cable, such as RG-58 or RG-8, to
connect an outdoor antenna. For lengths over 50 feet, use
RG-8 low-loss dielectric coaxial cable. If your antenna’s cable
does not have a BNC connector, you will also need a BNC
adapter (not supplied, available at your local RadioShack
store).

Follow the installation instructions supplied with the antenna,
route the antenna cable to the scanner, then connect it to the
antenna jack.


Use extreme caution when installing or removing an
outdoor antenna. If the antenna starts to fall, let it go!
It could contact overhead power lines. If the antenna
Warning!Warning!
touches a power line, touching the antenna, mast, cable,
or guy wires can cause electrocution and death. Call the
power company to remove the antenna. DO NOT attempt
to do so yourself.


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The Basics


using the belt clip

To make your scanner easier to
carry when you are on the go, use
the supplied belt clip by attaching
it to the back of the scanner. To
remove the battery clip, slide
it upward while pulling the tab
toward you.

transferring data to or
from another scanner or


PC

You can transfer the programmed data to and from another
PRO-97 scanner using a connecting cable which has 1/8
-inch phone plugs on both ends (not supplied). Connect
the cable between each scanner’s PC/IF jacks. See “Cloning
the Programmed Data”. You can also upload or download
the programmed data to or from a PC using an optional PC
interface kit available through your local RadioShack store.

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quick start

To help familiarize yourself with the scanner’s functions,
keypad, and available frequencies, you can utilize one of
these four features before you begin programming the
scanner.

Signal Stalker II — searches nearby strong signals quickly.
See “Signal Stalker II”.

Preprogrammed Search Banks — allow you to listen to
frequencies and decide which frequencies you want to store
when you are ready to program the scanner. See “Searching
a Preprogrammed Frequency Range”.

Manual Tuning — allows you to manually move through the
entire range of available frequencies. (See “Specifications”
for a list of the available frequency ranges.)

Weather Radio — allows you to listen to NOAA weather
broadcasts without programming. See “Listening to the
Weather Band”.

understanding your scanner’s modes

You can program each channel with any of seven receive
modes (AM, FM, CT, DC, MO, ED, and LT).

Each receive mode affects how your scanner operates when
scanning and receiving transmissions.

Your scanner’s closed mode lets you hear only those

Trunked modes (MO, ED and LT) can only be selected for
frequencies above 137 MHz. NotesNotes

trunking talkgroups you specify. For more information,

see “Open and Closed Modes”.

AM mode

The AM mode sets the scanner to receive transmissions
using amplitude modulation (AM), primarily used for aircraft,


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The Basics


military, some amateur radio, and some government
transmissions. (Refer to “Specifications” for a list of
the frequencies covered.) When the scanner receives a
transmission on a channel set to the AM mode, it always
stops on the transmission.

FM mode

The FM mode sets the scanner to receive transmissions
using frequency modulation (FM), used for most public
safety transmissions, as well as broadcast, business, and
amateur radio transmissions. When the scanner receives
a transmission on a channel set to the FM mode, it always
stops on the transmission.

CTCSS (CT) mode

CTCSS mode sets the scanner to receive transmissions
using frequency modulation (FM) with Continuous Tone
Coded Squelch System (CTCSS) subaudible tone codes.
CTCSS allows multiple users to share a single radio
frequency without hearing each other’s transmissions. In
your PRO-97 scanner, the CTCSS feature can be used to
block the reception of transmissions on shared channel to
only those that use the CTCSS mode also features a Code
Search setting that allows you to instantly display and store
unknown codes into the channel memory. CTCSS tones can
sometimes be heard as a low “hum” in the background of a
voice transmission.

DCS (DC) mode

DCS mode sets the scanner to receive transmissions using
frequency modulation (FM) with Digital Coded Squelch
(DCS) subaudible data signaling. DCS is very similar to
CTCSS, except that a digital code is transmitted instead of
an audio tone. Like CTCSS, DCS allows multiple users to
share a single radio frequency without hearing each other’s

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The Basics


transmissions. In your PRO-97 scanner, the DCS feature can
be used to block the reception of transmissions on a shared
channel to only those that use the DCS tone that you have
specified. DCS mode also features a Code Search setting
that allows you to instantly display and store unknown
codes into the channel memory. DCS data can sometimes
be heard as a low “purring” sound in the background of a
voice transmission. Some DCS systems transmit a special
“turn off code” at the end of each transmission. The turn off
code causes a properly equipped receiver to mute before
the transmission ends, eliminating the “squelch tail” burst of
noise the commonly occurs when the signal is lost.

Motorola mode

You can set your scanner so it decodes the talk group IDs
used with Motorola trunking systems. This setting is called
the Motorola mode.

Motorola systems are trunking systems used primarily by
business and public safety groups to efficiently allocate a
small number of frequencies (as few as five) to many groups
of users (as many as several thousand). To do this, each
group of users in the system is assigned to a specifi c talk
group. For example, the east side patrol officers might all
be assigned to talk group 2160. One channel in the system
is continuously transmitting data that identifies which talk
groups are active on which channel. In addition, this talk
group information is also transmitted as subaudible data on
each active channel.

When the scanner receives a transmission on a channel
set to the Motorola mode, it first decodes the talk group
ID data included with the transmission. In the open mode,
the scanner stops on the transmission and displays the talk
group ID on the bottom line of the display. In the closed
mode, the scanner only stops on the transmission if the talk
group ID matches a talk group ID that you have stored in the


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The Basics


bank’s talk group ID list and have not locked out.
Motorola trunking systems come in three categories: Type I,


Type II, and Type I/II Hybrid. Each category displays and uses
talk group IDs in slightly different ways.
Motorola Type II IDs are in the form FFF-SS, where;
FFF=Fleet ID
SS=Subfl eet ID
Type I systems are usually organized with different user


groups assigned to different fl eets.


where 000 identifies all police users and 12 identifi es the
detectives within a police department might be 000-12,
For example, a valid fl eet-subfleet ID identifying all NotesNotes
Detective division.

Tuning the scanner to an active control channel while
in Motorola mode will display the Motorola System. ID
and the approximate control channel message decode
success rate. This information can help you identify the
Motorola trunking system that you are monitoring and
the receive quality of the control channel signal.

To properly map the raw Type I data to the correct fl eetsubfleet format, you must program the correct fleet map into
the scanner. Fleet map information is widely available on the
Internet for most Type I systems in use.

Type II system talk groups are identified by a 5-digit number.
Valid talk group IDs are divisible by 16. If you try to enter an
invalid talk group ID, the scanner rounds the ID down to the
next valid ID.

Type I/II hybrid systems use both fl eet-subfl eet and 5-digit
formats for talk group IDs.

If the scanner decodes control channel data while
receiving transmissions from a Motorola trunking
system, CNTRL appears on the bottom line of the display.
NotesNotes
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EDACS mode

You can set your scanner so it decodes the talk group IDs
used with EDACS (GE/Ericsson) trunking systems. This
setting is called the EDACS mode.

EDACS systems are trunking systems used primarily by
business or private communications service providers, as
well as by some public safety organizations. EDACS systems
transmit active talk group information only on a dedicated
control channel.

EDACS frequencies are organized in a specifi c order. Each
frequency is assigned a Logical Channel Number (LCN). For
the scanner to correctly switch to an active frequency, you
must program the frequencies in LCN order, starting with
Memory 01. EDACS talk group IDs are entered as a 4-digit
decimal number from 0001 to 2047 or AFS (Agency Fleet
Subfleet) number from 00-001 to 15-157.

When there is activity on an EDACS system, that information
is sent out on the control channel. The scanner decodes the
ID for the active talk group. In the open mode, the scanner
then goes to the transmission and displays the talk group
ID on the bottom line of the display. In the closed mode, the
scanner only goes to transmissions with IDs that match talk
group IDs you have stored in the bank’s talk group ID list
which are not locked out.

Because EDACS scanning requires clear reception of the
control channel at all times, EDACS systems tend to have a
smaller usable area. An external antenna can greatly improve
EDACS scanning in a fringe area. If you are having trouble
scanning an EDACS system, try manually selecting the data
channel. If you are getting good reception, the scanner will
indicate talk group CTL-01. Try changing your location or
using an outdoor antenna to improve reception.


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LTR mode

You can set your scanner so it decodes the talk group IDs
used with LTR systems. This setting is called the LTR mode.

LTR frequencies are organized in a specifi c order. Each
frequency is assigned a Home Repeater Number (HR). For
the scanner to correctly switch to an active frequency, you
must program the frequencies in HR order, starting with
Memory X01 in the selected bank.

Your PRO-97 scanner features a new tool to help you
determine the correct channel mapping for LTR system
frequencies. The scanner’s LTR Repeater Finder displays the
current Home Repeater when monitoring LTR transmissions
in manual mode.

To determine the correct Home Repeater programming,
enter the system channels of an LTR system in any order. Be
sure to program the mode for each LTR channel to LT. Listen
to each channel one at a time in manual mode and watch for
the decoded LTR data at the bottom of the scanner’s display.
When an LTR transmission occurs, you should see the LTR
talkgroup information on the bottom line of the display, and
a number preceded by “R” in the bottom right hand corner
(i.e., R12). The “R” number is the Home Repeater number
that the current transmission is occurring on. To correctly
program this Home Repeater number into your scanner,
be sure that the channel number in the bank is equal to
the number that is displayed after the “R”. For example, if
you see R12 displayed on a particular LTR frequency, that
frequency needs to be programmed into Channel 12 of
the current bank in order to track the LTR system activity
properly.

LTR systems are trunking systems used primarily by
business or private communications service providers,
such as taxicabs, delivery trucks, and repair services. These
systems encode all trunking information as digital subaudible
data that accompanies each transmission. Users on an

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LTR system are assigned to specific talk groups, which are
identified by the radio as six-digit numbers. These numbers
are in the form AHHUUU, where:

A = Area code (0 or 1)

H = Home repeater (01 through 20)

U = User ID (000 through 254)

When the scanner receives a transmission on a channel set
to the LTR mode, it first decodes the LTR data included with
the transmission. In the open mode, the scanner stops on the
transmission and displays the talk group ID on the bottom line
of the display. In the closed mode, the scanner only stops on
the transmission if the LTR data matches a talk group ID that
you have stored in the bank’s talk group ID list and have


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